Survival Gear Lights For Sale Online

MATTHEW FARIDES: I
got ’em in my hand.
My heart is pounding right now.
I don’t know why.
He knows what’s happening.
NARRATOR: Two people with no
wilderness experience
dropped into the harshest
environments on the planet.
Their only lifeline…
MAN: Oh, holy (Bleep).
NARRATOR: …is someone
they’ve never met.
ALEX COKER: You can do this.
Keep pushing.
CLIFF HODGES: That water
is rising quickly, man.
You’ve got to get
across that river.
ALEX COKER: My
name is Alex Coker.
I’m a former United States Army
Infantry Airborne air assault
scout sniper.
I’m a former CIA special
protective agent.
I’m also a survival expert.
CLIFF HODGES: My
name is Cliff Hodges.
I own and operate a outdoor
school and guide service
and I teach primitive
wilderness survival skills.
NARRATOR: These experts using
high end surveillance technology
from a remote location will
push the survivors
beyond their limits.
MAN: I don’t know about this.
ALEX COKER: Step
it up and move out.
SARAH TIEFENTHALER: In here?
Just straight through this?
NARRATOR: The only reward
is getting out alive.
MAN: (Grunts) (Bleep).
ALEX COKER: Take him out.
MATTHEW FARIDES: My biggest
concern in general is just
places where you can take a
bad step and hurt your leg.
My name is Matthew Farides.
I’m out of Hartford,
Connecticut.
I do business development work
for an aerospace company.
What got me going on this was
the idea of something different.
You break from my
office routine.
I think pretty well on my feet
and I like to be in control
of my destiny.
I could probably get
through anything.
(Bleep).
The foliage is crazy thick out
here; undergrowth everywhere.
MICHAEL BARDEN: Looks
like we’ve got some sun.
That’s nice.
I am Michael Barden.
I am from Portland, Maine.
I’m a cook at two
different restaurants.
I’m 28 years old.
I keep telling my fiancé that if
the world were to fall apart,
we would still be all right.
And here’s a good
way of proving it.
I have a, uh, an illogical
fear of the dark.
The fact that I can’t see
anything around me
it freaks me out a little bit.
But, I mean, I’ve been to
space camp so
I know how to think on my feet.
ALEX COKER: Mike,
can you hear me?
MICHAEL BARDEN: Loud and clear.
ALEX COKER: My
name is Alex Coker.
I’m your survival expert.
I’m gonna lead you
down the right path.
MICHAEL BARDEN:
It’s an honor, sir.
ALEX COKER: Welcome to
the Pacific Northwest.
Alright, Mike, we’re gonna need
to get through downed trees
and traverse through steep
ravines to get to the overnight
spot in time to build a shelter
before nightfall.
Then you’re gonna need to battle
your way through a dense forest
and a tough thicket to reach
your extraction point.
We brought you here because you
said you have what it takes.
So guess what?
We’re about to find out.
MICHAEL BARDEN: I hear you.
I’m ready for it.
CLIFF HODGES: Welcome to
the Pacific Northwest.
My name is Cliff Hodges and I’m
gonna be your guide out here.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Uh, yes, sir.
Nice to meet you, Cliff.
CLIFF HODGES: You’ll first
encounter the decaying forest
in the deep woods and scale
down and out through
a sinkhole-filled lower valley
to reach your overnight spot.
Then you’ll need to tough your
way against the grain of canopy
covering upper pines and fight
through the thick cross-brush
to your extraction point.
You could be out here
for days or even weeks,
just depends on how
well you listen.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Roger that.
CLIFF HODGES:
Okay, listen close.
You’ve been equipped with
state-of-the-art surveillance
and survival gear.
Your pack contains
a knife, flashlight,
rope and a specialty item I’ll
reveal later to help you
on your journey.
There’s also a camera to
record personal thoughts.
Your pack also contains an
ultra-long range transmission
technology that was developed
for unmanned drone applications.
Under your shirt, there’s a
Hexoskin biometric scanner
that records vital signs
including respiratory levels
and heart rate.
All these data is gonna be
transmitted via a series
of repeaters to a command and
control base
where I’ll be monitoring you.
ALEX COKER: On your
right arm is an arm band.
This allows for numerous,
unmanned solo shot cameras
placed throughout the region
to track your movement.
MICHAEL BARDEN: Understood.
ALEX COKER: To your west is
nothing but deadly cliffs
along the coastline so you need
to head south through
the dense forest right
behind you.
MICHAEL BARDEN: Roger.
ALEX COKER: Where you at, Mike?
What are you feeling?
MICHAEL BARDEN: Uh,
slight disorientation.
ALEX COKER: Hold in place.
I’m about to fix your situation
’cause this won’t happen again.
I want you to take that
backpack off;
you open up that top pouch.
I left you a little something.
MICHAEL BARDEN: I’m
in the very top pouch.
I found the compass.
ALEX COKER: That little compass
is called a button compass.
That’s the specialty item that
I’ve chosen to help you find
your way out of here.
You know anything
about compasses?
MICHAEL BARDEN: They
point north, usually.
This one isn’t.
ALEX COKER: You know how many
degrees are on a compass?
MICHAEL BARDEN: What’s that?
Is that 360 like a circle?
ALEX COKER: Smart man.
So north would be
what on degrees?
MICHAEL BARDEN:
Either zero or 360.
ALEX COKER: I like the
way you’re talking.
South?
MICHAEL BARDEN: It’s 90.
ALEX COKER: Try again.
MICHAEL BARDEN: [Groans].
No, 180 degrees.
I’m sorry.
ALEX COKER: All right, brother,
keep that bearing
and let’s rock and roll.
MICHAEL BARDEN: All right.
ALEX COKER: You get lost
pretty quick out there, Mike.
Do you get out in nature often?
MICHAEL BARDEN: I love the
outdoors but, honestly,
I kind of just sit at home and
play video games and drink beer.
CLIFF HODGES: So to get started,
I need you to head due south up
that hill side
’cause we only have one way
to go to get
to your extraction point
and it’s through that dense
forest ahead of you.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Roger that.
CLIFF HODGES: All right, Matt,
looking at the topo here,
I’m pretty sure we’ve got a
relatively steep change
in elevation.
MATTHEW FARIDES: It’s pretty
slippery down here, man.
CLIFF HODGES: Matt seems like
a physically capable guy,
but most people lost in the wild
die within just a few miles
of help.
I just need him to follow my
directions to get through this.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Half the time
it’s hard to classify this
as walking. It’s more like
surfing downhill.
CLIFF HODGES: Be especially
carefully with these really soft
loamy soil, ’cause there are
definite deep sinkholes out here
MATTHEW FARIDES: (Bleep)!
CLIFF HODGES: There you go.
Give me a good angle.
Look over the edge and let me
see where that runs down to.
MATTHEW FARIDES: It’s
almost like a slide.
CLIFF HODGES: That’s about
a 50-foot drop below.
All right, we’ve got a
couple of options here, man.
One is we hunt for a trail
down and continue through
this slippery terrain.
The other option is you get your
pack out and use your rope
to lower yourself.
It’s definitely gonna save
time but we’d lose your rope.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Roger that.
CLIFF HODGES: I’m
gonna let you choose.
But just know losing that
rope could have consequences.
MATTHEW FARIDES: All right,
I’ll get my pack out.
CLIFF HODGES: Consider
that trail option, man.
Are you sure you want to
use your rope already?
MATTHEW FARIDES: I’m game, man.
I don’t want to twist an ankle
and anything else stupid ’cause
the ground is not
forgiving here.
CLIFF HODGES: Okay. Since you’re
gonna go with the rope
let’s do this right.
You want to look for
something to tie this to,
something sturdy.
Can we–what about where
your hands are, right there?
MATTHEW FARIDES: It’s
moving with my weight.
CLIFF HODGES: I hope it
doesn’t come loose
while you’re going down.
MATTHEW FARIDES:
I love this plan.
So what are we thinking
here for a knot?
CLIFF HODGES: We’re gonna
tie a figure eight on a bite.
So what I want you to do is
kind of loop that rope
back on itself.
So you’re gonna take that end
loop and kind of cross it back
over itself on the rope
just several inches back.
There you go.
And then wrap it around and
back down through the loop.
MATTHEW FARIDES: So now I got
an eight and I got a loop.
CLIFF HODGES: Alright, so let’s
wrap that around underneath
that root system.
There you go.
And we’re gonna toss it down.
And control your speed as you go
down by kind of just holding on
to that rope like you’re
wringing out a towel.
You can twist and tighten or
loosen to control your speed
as you go down the log.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Here we go.
(Bleep)!
CLIFF HODGES: Slow
down, slow down.
Twist the rope.
MATTHEW FARIDES:
(Bleep) this plan.
CLIFF HODGES: Okay, climb down
like you’re shimmying down
a tree.
MATTHEW FARIDES:
I’m coming around.
CLIFF HODGES: That
was pretty crazy.
MATTHEW FARIDES: That was fun.
CLIFF HODGES: You
made it down safe.
Glad about that, but doesn’t
mean it was the right call.
Matt is a pretty confident guy
but one thing you can’t do
in the wilderness is
be overconfident.
That rope could have been an
essential tool for fires,
shelters and now it’s gone.
MICHAEL BARDEN: Well, here
I am in the great, uh,
Northwestern Pacific wilderness.
It is tough work.
Who knows what tonight holds or
tomorrow holds or the next day
or the day after that, but
failure is not an option.
What a terrible piece
of (Bleep) compass.
ALEX COKER: I heard you kind
of talking under your breath
about my compass.
MICHAEL BARDEN: I don’t
like it very much.
ALEX COKER: Well, you’ve been
walking for well over an hour
in the woods and it’s kept you
on path to your overnight spot,
so I wouldn’t be complaining
too much if I were you.
MICHAEL BARDEN: [sighs].
ALEX COKER: Why you stopping?
We don’t have time for
you to be lollygagging.
MICHAEL BARDEN: I just
heard a creak in the tree.
ALEX COKER: Alright, well, there
could be an animal around.
Go ahead and put
your helo-cam on.
I’ll watch your six.
Look around you.
Do you see any signs around you,
like animal droppings or bones?
MICHAEL BARDEN: I
think I see something.
ALEX COKER: Mike,
those are claw marks.
Don’t move.
MICHAEL BARDEN: Oh, my god.
I’m getting a little erratic.
ALEX COKER: Relax.
Take a deep breath.
I’m not sure what it was.
I’m not seeing anything
in the area now,
but you need to be careful.
Keep your eyes open.
Sometimes these predators will
come back and revisit
their kills.
MICHAEL BARDEN: And I am
thanking my lucky stars.
CLIFF HODGES: All right, Matt,
probably gonna be another
eight hours or so before we get
to your overnight spot.
Kind of breathing
heavy there, man.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Climbing
some serious elevation here.
CLIFF HODGES: Looking
at your vitals,
you’re probably building
up a sweat as well.
MATTHEW FARIDES:
Uh, that’s a fact.
CLIFF HODGES: Here’s the
problem with sweating.
If your clothes are wet when
it’s time to go to bed,
that’s the difference
between life and death.
It could easily get down
to 40 degrees tonight.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Oh,
the 40s, that’s nothing.
CLIFF HODGES: Actually, Matt,
with wet clothes you can be
dealing with hypothermia
in the mid to high 50s.
Slow down, control
that body temperature.
MATTHEW FARIDES: I
feel pretty good.
It’s gonna be a lot of
work getting through this.
Trying to keep pace here.
CLIFF HODGES: He’s trying to
take control and do things
his way.
He’s gonna run into problems
real quickly if he doesn’t start
paying attention to my advice.
You know which
direction is which?
MATTHEW FARIDES: Trying
to use my own judgment.
CLIFF HODGES: I do
this for a living.
You gotta listen to me or you’re
just gonna waste
valuable sunlight here.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Roger that.
CLIFF HODGES: Hopefully we’re
gonna get enough sun out here
to create a little sundial.
Most people think that a sundial
is really just for telling time.
But out here in the wilderness,
you can also use it to navigate.
So the first thing I want you to
do is to grab a three-foot long
stick, place it in the ground
in a most open and sunny spot.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Looking for a
sunny spot ’cause
there’s not much out here.
CLIFF HODGES: It’s just really
important that
Matt takes a minute.
He’s been sweating for a while.
There you go.
Stick in the ground; make sure
it holds
in a place where the sun is
hitting it.
I want you to mark the tip of
the shadow of that stick
and do another stick in the
ground.
MATTHEW FARIDES: There’s
a shadow right there.
I got a marker stick
right where it’s sitting.
CLIFF HODGES: We need to let
that sit and we’ll watch
the shadow movement and get
a good east-west line.
Alright, the next thing
I want you to do, Matt,
I don’t know exactly what’s
gonna be around you later
so if we can collect food now
and store it in your pack
that’s gonna be ideal.
Alright, right there
you got black twinberry.
So we’re gonna collect those.
I don’t want you eating
anything yet
but we want to be storing
food for later.
But you see how
they grow in pairs?
That’s why they’re
called twinberries.
And every time you pick a berry,
you’d say thank you to the earth
for providing because these may
be the last calories you get.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Right.
[chuckles].
CLIFF HODGES: It looks like
those clouds
are really moving in.
Let’s get back and read that
sundial before it’s too late.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Roger that.
Yeah, the clouds have been
moving through constantly.
It has moved a couple inches.
CLIFF HODGES: Perfect.
Mark where the new tip is.
Here’s what we got.
The stick that marked the first
shadow and the new stick
are your east-west line.
And the first stick
you planted is west.
The second stick
you planted is east.
So I want you to stand so that
you are now facing south.
Head in that direction.
We still got about five
hours to your overnight spot.
MATTHEW FARIDES: It’s
very dense in here.
One of my issues is I definitely
like to have control.
I’m relying on Cliff
at this point, so.
A little uneasy.
ALEX COKER: Alright, Mike,
you’re three hours in
and you’ve made it through
the downed trees.
But we still have three more
hours to get passed the ravine
to get to your overnight spot.
MICHAEL BARDEN:
[Breathing heavily].
[Coughs].
[Breathes heavily].
ALEX COKER: Maybe I can get
my drone to come drop you an
oxygen tank
’cause it sounds
like you need it.
Do you do anything
physically active?
MICHAEL BARDEN: I am a member
of the Society
for Creative Anachronism.
ALEX COKER: I’m having
a little trouble.
MICHAEL BARDEN: [Chuckles].
ALEX COKER: I’m not
really understanding.
It’s kind of new to me.
MICHAEL BARDEN: Medieval,
uh, sword-play combat.
I dress up in armor
and, uh, go into battle.
None of that larping (Bleep)
where they hit each other
with Styrofoam pads.
We smack each other with
rattan sticks and it hurts.
ALEX COKER: Alright, look, I’m
pretty good at keeping secrets,
okay.
And just between you and me,
have you ever stormed a castle?
MICHAEL BARDEN: [Chuckles].
No, I have not.
[Sighs]
ALEX COKER: Slow your rolls.
You go too fast you’re gonna
definitely be thirsty.
MICHAEL BARDEN: [Exhaling].
ALEX COKER: It looks like you’re
making your descent
to the ravine.
I’m seeing a spot where
you can cross here, Mike.
It’s a log, but be careful.
There is a 40-foot
drop down below.
MICHAEL BARDEN: Crap.
ALEX COKER: This is dangerous.
You slip off that moss you could
literally break your leg
and help could be hours away.
MICHAEL BARDEN: Huge risk.
Huge, huge risk.
ALEX COKER: Watch your footing.
Three-points of
contact at all times.
This is your rock star moment.
Take your time and go
ahead…and do your thing.
Yeah, go ahead.
Slow, very slow.
MICHAEL BARDEN: Got it.
(Bleep).
ALEX COKER: Talk to me.
MICHAEL BARDEN: Jesus Christ.
ALEX COKER: Just go slow.
Go very slow.
MICHAEL BARDEN: This moss
is wet.
MICHAEL BARDEN: (Bleep)!
ALEX COKER: Are you okay?
MICHAEL BARDEN: Doing
fine now, thank you.
ALEX COKER: Just take your time.
Watch your footing.
Good job, man.
I’m impressed.
How did that feel?
MICHAEL BARDEN: It was
actually kind of a rush.
CLIFF HODGES: Okay, Matt, it
looks like you made it
through the dense woods and
down into the lower valley
and you made your first big
discovery here.
It’s time to collect some water.
So before we get started, you
ever heard of beaver fever?
MATTHEW FARIDES: My family has
always warned about
drinking water out of rivers
’cause of that reason.
CLIFF HODGES: Exactly.
Beaver fever is giardia.
Beavers use the water as their
bathroom and that’s how
the stream gets contaminated.
So we’re gonna be able to
collect your water here
but you’re not gonna be
able to drink it.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Uh, roger that.
CLIFF HODGES: What do
you have in your pack?
MATTHEW FARIDES: Looks like
I’ve got an empty can.
CLIFF HODGES: That empty can is
your specialty item
that I chose for you, Matt.
What we really have is a
water-carrying vessel
and we can then possibly use
that can to boil later on.
So that might be what saves
your life tonight
or tomorrow morning.
Fill it up with water.
MATTHEW FARIDES: All right,
I’ve got a relatively
clean tin can full of water
here.
CLIFF HODGES: You’re gonna
treat that can like
it is the most precious gift
on this earth.
MATTHEW FARIDES: How
should I be carrying this?
CLIFF HODGES: Hold that can at
a right angle
and don’t let it spill.
MATTHEW FARIDES: That
sounds like a challenge.
ALEX COKER: Alright now, Mike…
…tinder is gonna be very
important later tonight.
Inside the trunks, they are the
same thing that stuff
that feels brittle and dry and
that can be used for tinder.
And also if you can get some
small twigs and stuff
that you can break apart
as well.
MICHAEL BARDEN: Found a
glass 12-ounce bottle.
ALEX COKER: What are
you gonna do with that?
MICHAEL BARDEN:
I don’t know yet.
ALEX COKER: Keep your eyes
open for any type of edible…
MICHAEL BARDEN: What
do I see around me?
[groans] I just see moss.
I see, uh, these
big stupid leaves.
I don’t think I’m
gonna spot anything.
I’m thinking I’m wasting time.
We’re running out of daylight.
I need to get to camp.
I am just wasting time.
ALEX COKER: Mike is letting
his attitude get in the way
of his thinking.
This area is filled
with salmonberries,
wild roses and ferns for a blast
of hydration and calories.
MICHAEL BARDEN: I’m
looking on the ground.
I don’t see anything.
ALEX COKER: You’re
absolutely killing me.
I’m not gonna sit out and take
my drone out there
and start dropping berries in
front of your face.
MICHAEL BARDEN: I don’t
expect you to, sir,
but I am having a hard
time finding things.
ALEX COKER: Fine.
Just keep moving.
MICHAEL BARDEN: I think now my
stubbornness is starting
to show in a little bit.
This thought of thirst, it’s
what’s gonna be on my mind.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Super
muddy up the hill here.
CLIFF HODGES: You made it out of
the lower valley
and kept that water intact.
We’ve arrived at
your overnight spot.
Congratulations, Matt,
that’s great work.
We need to build a
shelter, but first,
I think it’s time to
start working on fire.
What do you think of that?
MATTHEW FARIDES: Uhh… I was
hoping you’d say that.
Would love to not be wearing
this pack right now.
CLIFF HODGES: Go ahead
and take your helmet off.
At the same time though, put
your jacket on
because we want to keep that
core temperature up
as these temperatures start to
drop for the night.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Roger that.
CLIFF HODGES: What we’re gonna
build here is a basic
teepee structure
for your camp fire.
So let’s start with just a huge
bundle of those really skinny,
less than pencil-width
size twigs.
After we get the fire structure,
we’ll get that tinder bundle lit
and that tinder bundle
will go inside the teepee.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Well, I think
I’ve got enough to get
a pretty decent fire started
here.
CLIFF HODGES: You ever
heard of hand drill?
MATTHEW FARIDES: Yes, I’ve
heard of hand drill.
I was afraid you were
going to say that.
CLIFF HODGES: I want you to
start looking for one of those
cedar branches to use
as the fireboard
to your hand drill fire kit.
MATTHEW FARIDES: So this is,
uh, it’s actually pretty,
pretty firm.
What’s next?
CLIFF HODGES: You’ve
got your kit set up.
So what happens is when you
start spinning the spindle
or the drill in the fireboard
that wood heats up enough
that it starts to burn.
So we’ll keep working the drill
until we get that coal
that continues to smoke
on its own.
This is your best chance of
getting clean water tonight.
Come on, Matt, go!
Keep that speed
and pressure on it.
It’s starting to smoke.
MATTHEW FARIDES:
I ran out of spit.
CLIFF HODGES: Sorry. I don’t
think this is happening.
I want you to stop
trying to make fire.
You gotta work on your shelter
before it gets dark
and these temperature start
dropping.
MATTHEW FARIDES: I’m
gonna go for this.
(Exhales)
CLIFF HODGES: Matt’s going for
fire here instead of working
on his shelter.
It’s a pretty big gamble.
Building a shelter in the
dark is gonna be brutal.
(Bleep).
(Bleep). It’s not changing.
It just keeps
smoking a little bit.
All I really managed to do is
start taking the skin
off my hands.
Um, so it’s pretty frustrating.
CLIFF HODGES: Even
with all that smoke,
your best couple of chances with
friction fire
are the first few attempts
before your body is tired
and you burn through that
fireboard.
Now you’re gonna be building
your shelter in the dark.
We gotta get this thing done as
soon as possible
so I can keep you warm and alive
tonight.
MATTHEW FARIDES: You got it.
(Bleep).
CLIFF HODGES: We are going to
build what is called
a debris shelter.
Unfortunately, this is where
that choice of yours to lose
the rope is gonna come
back to haunt you.
Without it, lashing together
your shelter frame and door
is gonna take a lot longer.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Roger that.
CLIFF HODGES: We’re basically
building an all-natural
sleeping bag.
The first step to build a debris
hut we do need a ridge pole
and you’ve got that downed
tree right there.
MATTHEW FARIDES: How does this
do for wild animals
and that kind of thing?
CLIFF HODGES: Oh, you’ll be
hidden but that’s all
I can really guarantee.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Um…
yeah, if I, if I had to,
I could probably get under this.
CLIFF HODGES: All the air that’s
on the inside of that shelter
your body has to heat.
Right here, we’ve got our
backbone laying down.
You can start collecting ribs to
lay it along either side
of that ridge pole.
We’re gonna need a ton of these.
Perfect.
You basically are gonna need a
good 50 to 60 on either side.
MATTHEW FARIDES:
I’ll get to work.
(Sighs)
MICHAEL BARDEN: Down at
the bottom of this canyon,
there looks to be some water.
There is a stream
right beside me.
ALEX COKER: Make your way over
to the fastest moving water.
MICHAEL BARDEN: I see it.
ALEX COKER: First I would try to
take your containers
that you found along the way
and wash those out.
MICHAEL BARDEN: [Sighs].
ALEX COKER: Is that
frustration in your voice?
MICHAEL BARDEN: It probably is.
You know what?
You gave me a pack that I
can’t (Bleep) work with.
It just, every time
I try to take it off,
everything has to come off.
ALEX COKER: Let me explain
something to you there, Mike.
Myself, I’ve carried over
90 pounds on my rucksack,
carried it for many miles and
I sucked it up
and I kept driving on.
That’s what you need to do.
Get your head in the game.
MICHAEL BARDEN: [Exhales].
Hey, am I drinking this running
water right from the uhhh,
receptacle I got?
ALEX COKER: I know you’re
thirsty but there’s too many
contaminants in the
water like giardia.
I’m sorry, brother.
We’re gonna try and
boil that water.
At this point in time what we
got to do is set up
where you’re gonna build your
fire.
So do the best you can and
gather some wood together.
We only got about an hour and a
half left of sun
to get to your overnight spot.
We need to do this quick.
We don’t want you to get stuck
down the ravine overnight
because if it rains,
it’s prone to washouts.
Do you have your dry tinder?
MICHAEL BARDEN: Yeah.
ALEX COKER: All right, what I’d
like you to do is pull out
your flashlight; pretty good
little heat source.
MICHAEL BARDEN: Maybe I could
break the bulb and use it
to ignite the tinder.
ALEX COKER: You break that
filament, we’re done.
I would suggest maybe
taking your knife, okay,
and maybe with the point
of it barely tap
the very end of that bulb.
MICHAEL BARDEN:
I’ll give it a shot.
I think my filament’s intact.
ALEX COKER: Once you
break that glass housing,
that filament is gonna
be exposed to oxygen.
And as soon as you turn it on,
it’s gonna burn out
pretty quick.
So make it count.
You got one shot.
Make it happen.
MICHAEL BARDEN: That was it.
Half a second.
Filament’s dead.
ALEX COKER: Well, in
a survival situation,
we don’t always get fires.
MICHAEL BARDEN: But if I don’t
have a fire, I don’t have water,
and if I don’t have
water, I-I-I can’t.
ALEX COKER: You got the
materials needed to start a fire
using a fire plow or hand drill.
Improvise.
MICHAEL BARDEN: I am having a
very hard time being so far
from hydrated.
It’s useless.
[sighs].
I’m gonna lounge around.
ALEX COKER: You can’t just
quit and give up on yourself.
If you can conquer
the mind, Mike,
your body will surprise you
what’s capable of doing.
MICHAEL BARDEN: (Bleep).
CLIFF HODGES: Matt, I know
you’re sweating right now…
CLIFF HODGES: …and
at this point,
you’re definitely
battling dehydration,
which is gonna make you
dizzy and uncoordinated.
Please be careful
as you’re working.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Roger that.
CLIFF HODGES: Go ahead and start
piling debris out on that thing
to insulate it and close it off.
MATTHEW FARIDES: [Exhaling].
MATTHEW FARIDES: I’m
sweating like crazy.
CLIFF HODGES: Definitely want to
keep sweating down but
when that temperature gets down
you can only go a few hours
without shelters.
And without that rope, Matt,
you’re not gonna be able to put
together an insulating
door in time.
You’re a heck of a lot more
susceptible to exposure.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Oh, you suck.
I’m gonna start
working on my door.
(Bleep)!
CLIFF HODGES: Matt!
Hey, Matt, are you okay?
MATTHEW FARIDES: Yeah, I hit the
edge of my floating island here
and it kind of gave
out so I took a tumble.
CLIFF HODGES: I think you’re
probably pretty tired,
which is understandable, so.
What I want you to do is sit
down in front of your shelter
there, take out those wild
edibles we collected
earlier today and eat
about half of them.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Yeah, those
twinberries pretty much
just turned into marmalade
in the bottom here.
That wasn’t really
much of a success.
I’m pretty much out of juice.
I’ve been sweating out most
of the water I had in me.
I’m already getting some muscle
twitches and that kind of thing
from being dehydrated, and it’s
gonna get really tough for me
to keep working on this.
That’s where I’m at.
Back to it.
ALEX COKER: Mike, I’ve been
trying to motivate you
for three hours and all you
managed to do is lay around,
skip stones and argue
with me about a fire.
Because you’ve wasted time with
your griping and complaining,
guess what?
It’s dark.
I’m not gonna have you walk
around out there and get hurt.
You’re stuck down here.
MICHAEL BARDEN: Oh, Jesus.
ALEX COKER: So you gotta deal
what the situation that you have
at hand and make the best of it.
Do you understand?
I suggest you try sleeping under
that cave so you have some cover
for the night in case it rains.
MICHAEL BARDEN: The only thing
on my mind is the fact that
there’s water right there
and I cannot drink it.
And I don’t want to
sleep under that.
It’s scary.
That is the scariest place I
could ever imagine
sleeping under.
ALEX COKER: I know
you have nyctophobia,
or fear of the dark, but
oftentimes it’s just fear
of the unknown.
You came out here to challenge
yourself
in a survival situation.
Unfortunately, darkness and the
unknown are large parts of that.
MICHAEL BARDEN: [Coughs].
So here I am in a canyon.
I’m a little agitated.
The dark.
As weird as it sounds,
it really scares me,
a whole hell of a lot.
I understand wanting to push me
to my limits and you know
I’m all for that, but
this is dangerous.
What the hell is that?
ALEX COKER: A lot of things go
bump in the night there, Mike.
Control your breathing and limit
your movement to make yourself
less detectable
to the predators.
MICHAEL BARDEN: (Bleep).
CLIFF HODGES: It looks like that
shelter is about
as good as it’s gonna get.
So as you get in there
kind of what I want you to
think about is
it might be uncomfortable but
it’s also just an incredible
experience to sleep
that close to the earth.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Well, you’ve
got a hell of way of putting
a positive spin on things, sir.
Every time I move,
dirt falls in my eyes.
This is rough.
CLIFF HODGES: Go ahead
and pull some logs,
a little bit of debris in front
of the entrance to your shelter.
If you had that rope, we could
lash together a door quickly
that would be a lot more
effective
than this pile of logs.
Probably gonna be a lot of
cold air getting in there.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Give a million
bucks for a cheeseburger
and a shower right now.
CLIFF HODGES: Enjoy your sleep.
Pretty rough night?
MATTHEW FARIDES: [Chuckles].
Yes, sir, it was brutal.
I could not get warm.
Got, I don’t know, maybe an
hour or two of sleep combined.
CLIFF HODGES: What I want you to
do is tear that shelter down,
leave no trace.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Roger that.
CLIFF HODGES: I just
wanted to congratulate you.
Definitely got low
enough temperatures,
high enough winds throughout
the night
that if you weren’t in that
shelter, you aren’t making it.
Just know that.
MATTHEW FARIDES: It was an
effective wind block at least,
but I did a crap job on the door
here; a lot of cold air gets in.
CLIFF HODGES: Wishing you
would have had that rope?
MATTHEW FARIDES:
Certainly, um…
CLIFF HODGES: But
wait a minute, Matt.
Are you telling me that you
think you might have learned
something in this experience?
MATTHEW FARIDES: [Chuckles].
I would definitely have
different concerns
or different
thoughts in my head.
CLIFF HODGES: You can be taught.
MATTHEW FARIDES: [chuckles].
CLIFF HODGES: Awesome.
Good to hear.
Did you still have that
can of water by you?
MATTHEW FARIDES: I do indeed.
CLIFF HODGES: What we need to do
then is to get you out
to that evac point, I want you
to walk over to that can,
then dump it out.
Put that can in your pack
because there’s no way we’re
gonna get that water purified.
MATTHEW FARIDES: (Bleep).
CLIFF HODGES: Today, you’ll have
to get through the upper pines
and cross brush to get
to your extraction point.
But you’re severely dehydrated.
We’re gonna have to find some
emergency hydration sources
along the way.
ALEX COKER: Rise
and shine, Mike!
MICHAEL BARDEN: (Bleep).
ALEX COKER: Up and at ’em!
MICHAEL BARDEN: It was really
cold last night in this
godforsaken canyon and I was
shaking and
I didn’t get any sleep.
This was terrible.
No water, no food, no fire,
but hey, I’m still here.
I’m still making it through it.
ALEX COKER: Mike, you hear me?
We gotta get some
calories in you
or you’re not gonna be
able to finish.
Look around that water, see if
there’s anything edible to eat.
MICHAEL BARDEN: Crayfish.
(Bleep).
Yeah.
I was able to get
myself a crayfish.
ALEX COKER: It should be
okay eating those live.
MICHAEL BARDEN: I
don’t know if I can.
They’re ugly.
Every time I’ve
tried to eat lobster,
I get sick to my stomach
and it’s because I’m
staring at the thing.
ALEX COKER: You gotta
eat something, brother.
You need the calories and the
small amount of water
the little guy is gonna
supply you.
MICHAEL BARDEN: I don’t know.
I-I-I really can’t.
I–I’m gonna puke this up.
ALEX COKER: You came
here to change things.
You came here to
make a better Mike.
You conquered your fear of
darkness, now conquer your fear.
We need the calories.
MICHAEL BARDEN: I
got it in my hand.
ALEX COKER: Look,
he’s waving at you.
Take him out!
MICHAEL BARDEN: My heart
is pounding right now.
I don’t know why.
He knows what’s happening.
ALEX COKER: Go for it,
go for it, go for it.
(CHOKING/COUGHING)
You are the man,
Mike, you hear me?
MICHAEL BARDEN: That was gross.
[Laughs].
ALEX COKER: We just conquered
some new goals there.
MICHAEL BARDEN: Oh, I did.
Whaa.
ALEX COKER: Look
over to your right.
I think I see something a little
tastier than that crawfish
over there.
MICHAEL BARDEN: [Groans].
Oh, berries.
ALEX COKER: If you weren’t
preoccupied with pouting
last night, you would have
already found them.
MICHAEL BARDEN: Aye.
ALEX COKER: But look, you’ve got
an eight-hour hike ahead of you
to get to your extraction point.
That crawfish and berries should
give you some much-needed
calories and a boost of water.
You’re gonna need that to get
through the dense of forest
and thicket.
Keep going. If not,
you’re gonna get stuck out
here another night.
MICHAEL BARDEN: What
is the direction?
ALEX COKER: Northbound,
up the hill.
MICHAEL BARDEN: All right,
I think I can do that.
ALEX COKER: I like that
new attitude, Mike.
Sounds like you are
definitely born again.
CLIFF HODGES: I need you to
take a slightly lower line.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Roger that.
This is really humbling.
CLIFF HODGES: See a lot
of ferns at your feet.
Now we can get a little
emergency hydration.
MATTHEW FARIDES: How about
these little guys, huh?
CLIFF HODGES: Perfect.
Pop it in.
MATTHEW FARIDES:
Mmm, bitter paper.
CLIFF HODGES: Hey, you
take what you can get.
MATTHEW FARIDES: [Chuckles].
CLIFF HODGES: Matt,
what’s going on, man?
I see that you’re not moving.
You know which way you’re going?
MATTHEW FARIDES: I have
no idea where I’m going.
CLIFF HODGES: Well, Matt, you’ve
made your way through
the deep woods, in and out of
that lower valley
and across the upper pines.
Now, you’ve got just a couple
of miles of cross brush to go.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Roger that.
CLIFF HODGES: You need to
go north to a clearing.
That’s your extraction point
where I’m gonna meet you.
For your final task, I’m
turning control over to you.
It’s your job to figure
out how to get there.
If you don’t make it, you’ll be
spending another night out here.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Not happening.
MATTHEW FARIDES: All right,
I’m good to go with that.
I think I’m good now.
MICHAEL BARDEN: The terrain’s
a little rough with
all these trees knocked down in
my way.
ALEX COKER: Getting
those Rambo scars.
MICHAEL BARDEN: [Groans].
ALEX COKER: Fight through it.
MICHAEL BARDEN: Yeah!
Oh.
Continuing the drive.
ALEX COKER: Are you gonna
incorporate this
into your sword training?
MICHAEL BARDEN: Maybe,
for kill battles.
ALEX COKER: Okay, I think you’re
getting close to
where my location is at.
You’ve trekked over downed trees
and finally got out
of a steep ravine to get through
a dense forest.
You got one last challenge:
a few miles of thicket.
What you’re gonna have
to do is climb a tree.
Once you get to the top, I need
you to look for a game trail
that leads to a clearing.
Use your compass,
get your bearing,
’cause that’s gonna be
the extraction point.
MICHAEL BARDEN: I got it.
ALEX COKER: I’m putting
it in your hands.
Alright, we’ve come
a long ways together.
It’s up to you to find
the rest of the way.
Good luck climbing that tree.
I’m on my way to see you.
MICHAEL BARDEN: [Sighs].
Oh.
There it is!
Duh!
(Bleep) (Bleep).
Of course, just
lost the compass.
(Bleep).
[Sighs].
The brush is very thick.
Uh, I just lost the trail.
I see a cushion in front
of me and it’s opening up.
Oh!
ALEX COKER: There you are, Mike!
MICHAEL BARDEN: Yeah!
A few sights for sore eyes.
ALEX COKER: Good job,
good job, good job.
MICHAEL BARDEN: Thank you.
Thank you, Alex.
ALEX COKER: Tell
me how that tastes.
MICHAEL BARDEN: [Groans].
ALEX COKER: I got a lot
more where that came from.
MICHAEL BARDEN: I’ve never
pushed myself that far before.
I’m gonna take away a lot from
this experience for sure.
The hardest part of this whole
event was definitely
my night in the canyon.
I was about ready to give up.
All said and done, I
think I did all right.
ALEX COKER: You did great.
You did great.
MICHAEL BARDEN: I’m
very proud of myself.
Just being able to get through
it makes me realize
how much potential
that I actually have.
ALEX COKER: I’m
very proud of Mike.
I thought he was gonna possibly
quit, but he embraced the suck.
And that’s the way you gotta be.
Never give up.
MATTHEW FARIDES: We’re about an
inch and a half
from where it was.
Two points, east-west,
I’m on my way.
Constant battle to
stay on your feet.
I’m not sure I’m
on the right path.
Nothing.
[Sighs].
CLIFF HODGES: Matt.
MATTHEW FARIDES:
What’s up, dude?
Nice to meet you, Cliff.
CLIFF HODGES: Great to
finally meet you in person.
MATTHEW FARIDES:
Absolutely, man.
CLIFF HODGES: Congratulations.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Thank you.
CLIFF HODGES: How you feeling?
MATTHEW FARIDES: I’m tired.
Yeah, I could use a couple of
gallons of water, I think.
The darkest moment was
easily overnight last night.
Actually physically shaking
for several hours, I mean,
I didn’t really get much sleep.
There was a lot of things I
should have talked with Cliff
about a little more, rather than
just pushing back
on some of his instructions.
My pride was hurt more
than anything else.
CLIFF HODGES: Cool. So how about
we get a little water
and steak in you?
MATTHEW FARIDES:
Sounds awesome, man.
CLIFF HODGES: All right.
MATTHEW FARIDES: Let’s go.
CLIFF HODGES: The most
challenging thing about Matt was
to get him to let go of
that concept of control.
I think Matt was very much
shaken out of his routine.
I would like to take
the credit for that,
but that’s just nature doing
its thing.

48 Survival Gear Lights For Sale Online Near Me


48 Facts About Survival Gear Lights For Sale Online At Dec 27th

Survival Gear Lights For Sale Online