Tactical Flashlight Clearance How To Purchase

ALEX COKER:
Take your time.
Just keep leaning back.
Lean back with your butt.
ANDREW MILICH: Oh, man.
NARRATOR: Two people with no
wilderness experience dropped
into the harshest
environments on the planet.
Their only lifeline…
MAN: Holy (bleep).
NARRATOR: …is someone
they’ve never met.
ALEX COKER: You can do this.
Keep pushing.
CLIFF HODGES: That water
is rising quickly, man.
You’ve got to get
across that river.
ALEX COKER: My name is…
…Alex Coker.
I’m a former United States Army
Infantry Airborne air assault
scout sniper.
I’m a former CIA special
protective agent.
I’m also a survival expert.
CLIFF HODGES: My name…
…is Cliff Hodges.
I own and operate a outdoor
school and guide service,
and I teach primitive
wilderness survival skills.
NARRATOR: These experts, using
high-end surveillance technology
from a remote location, will
push the survivors
beyond their limits.
ANDREW MILICH: I
don’t know about this.
ALEX COKER: Step
it up and move out.
SARAH TIEFENTHALER: In here?
Just straight through this?
NARRATOR: The only reward
is getting out alive.
MAN: [Grunts] (Bleep).
ALEX COKER: Take him out.
ANDREW MILICH: It’s
pretty dry out here.
I’m, uh…I’m getting
a little nervous.
My name’s Andrew Milich.
I’m from Phoenix, Arizona.
I’m an executive pastor
and I’m 40 years old.
I signed up for this because I
grew up in inner city Chicago,
so I really didn’t have
an outdoor experience.
When I moved to Arizona
about 15 years ago, I–uh,
my family was a big outdoor
family that I married into.
So they think that
I’m a city kid.
And I told my wife,
I’ll tell them,
Yeah, I can do that.
And she’s like, No,
you probably can’t.
There’s no sign of life.
I don’t know what I’ve
gotten myself into now.
I have the determination
to get through this
and the grit to get
through this.
So I’m ready to get this going.
PAUL ARCHER: On a scale of
ten, as far as physically fit,
I’ll say I’m about a nine.
My name is …Paul Archer.
I’m from–originally
from Houston, Texas.
I work out six days a week, so
nature’s gonna have to bring it.
A great experience for
me would be to survive,
and being that my
family would see this,
and to be inspired in their
lives to do whatever.
This is, this is totally
different from the outdoors
I’m used to, from the beach.
And I’m up for the challenge.
I’m gonna do real well.
However long it takes,
I’m gonna finish.
That’s a promise.
Ah, man.
ALEX COKER: Andrew,
can you hear me?
ANDREW MILICH: I
can hear you fine.
ALEX COKER: Welcome to
the hot deserts of Utah.
ANDREW MILICH: You
only come to a place…
…like this to hide or to die.
ALEX COKER: My
name is Alex Coker.
I’m a former United States Army
Infantry Airborne air assault
scout sniper.
I’m also your survival expert.
ANDREW MILICH: I’m glad you
got more experience than me.
ALEX COKER: All right.
Here we go.
You’re gonna need to scale up
loose gravel hills and cross a
punishing cracked desert valley
to get to your overnight spot.
Then you’re gonna need to scale
over jagged cliffs to get over a
mountain base and trek over dry
flats to reach the top
of a high desert mesa.
That’s gonna be your
extraction point.
I hope you know what
you’re in for because I do.
ANDREW MILICH: All right.
Let’s do this.
CLIFF HODGES: Hi, Paul.
How are you doing?
PAUL ARCHER: How are you doing?
What’s going on?
CLIFF HODGES: My name is Cliff.
I’m gonna be your
guide out here.
I’m a professional wilderness
survival instructor.
I’ve been guiding people through
survival situations
my entire adult life.
Here are the challenges
ahead of you, man.
You’ve got to get through a
boulder field, large sand dunes,
and steep mesa tops in order
to reach your overnight spot.
Then you’ll need to climb over a
treacherous mountain to a flat
that’ll be your
extraction point.
Paul, I’m gonna do my best to
take care of you and get you
through this safely.
PAUL ARCHER: I trust
you with my life.
CLIFF HODGES:
Okay, listen close.
You’ve been equipped with a
state-of-the-art surveillance
and survival gear.
Your pack contains a
knife, flashlight, rope,
and a specialty item I’ll reveal
later to help you
on your journey.
There’s also a camera to
record personal thoughts.
Your pack also contains an
ultra-long-range transmission
technology that was developed
for unmanned drone applications.
Under your shirt, there’s a
Hexoskin biometric scanner
that records vital signs
including respiratory levels
and heart rate.
All this data’s gonna be
transmitted via a series
of repeaters to a command and
control base where I’ll be
monitoring you.
That band on your left arm, it
sends signals to a bunch
of unmanned solo shot cameras
placed throughout this area
to track your movement.
You’re gonna start out here by
making your way up
this boulder field.
PAUL ARCHER: Let’s get it going.
CLIFF HODGES: It’s a good 400
to 500-foot elevation gain.
This boulder field was formed
by these mountains slowly
crumbling.
Anything under your feet
could move at any moment.
PAUL ARCHER: Got it.
CLIFF HODGES: Paul looks
kind of awkward out there.
Not that the desert is the
easiest place to be dropped
into, but I’m a little curious
to see how this is gonna go.
PAUL ARCHER: [Pants]
Let’s see. This is a workout.
[Chuckles]
CLIFF HODGES:
You’re at about 7,500 feet.
A lot less oxygen.
Feeling that in your lungs yet?
PAUL ARCHER: Yeah. I’m starting
to breathe a little bit. [Pants]
Man, do you see these
big boulders I got to climb?
CLIFF HODGES: I do, but
unfortunately it’s the only way
to get through this area, and
you still have about 250 feet
to go.
PAUL ARCHER: I’m
starting to sweat.
A lot of bugs in my face.
I made it up, man.
CLIFF HODGES: All right, Paul,
how are you feeling after that
climb?
PAUL ARCHER: Those last couple
of boulders got me though,
but I made it up, man.
CLIFF HODGES: You
did great, dude.
I’m proud of you.
ALEX COKER: Andrew, I need
to be able to see your face.
I want you to put that
halo cam on your helmet.
Embrace the suck, ruck up, and
head to the top of the hill.
There’s nothing but clay and
sand that could collapse
underneath your feet.
We have about a six-hour walk to
find a decent overnight spot.
Let’s get rolling.
ANDREW MILICH: All right.
Here we go.
ALEX COKER: Be careful.
Remember, there are, uh,
deadly snakes up here.
ANDREW MILICH:
I’ll tell you what.
It’s a-this is a barren
land right here, boy.
ALEX COKER: All right.
You kind of sound, uh,
definitely out of breath.
I’m looking at
your pulse reading.
It’s going crazy right now.
ANDREW MILICH: Two
hundred and ten pounds.
It’s a good workout.
ALEX COKER: My first impression
of Andrew is he looks
a little out of shape, but he
might have a heart of gold.
And a heart can see you through
things when the body might fail.
ANDREW MILICH: This
is steep right here.
I might be taking
a slide right here.
ALEX COKER: If you
do take a slide,
you’re probably not gonna stop
for several hundred feet.
So, I don’t recommended it.
But I do suggest you should
try turning uphill
and using a side-by-side step.
ANDREW MILICH: [Pants]
All right. Man, I got to stop
and look at the view.
ALEX COKER: I’ll give you that.
Good job.
Look around.
ANDREW MILICH: Woo.
ALEX COKER: Enjoy it.
Embrace it.
ANDREW MILICH: Man,
what a beautiful view.
PAUL ARCHER: So I just made
it up the boulder hill.
I’m in pretty good
shape, but it was work.
It ain’t no joke.
Uh, it’s really hot out here.
These, these bugs, man.
There’s freaking
bugs everywhere.
Hopefully I’ll see
you guys again.
[Pants]
CLIFF HODGES: I want you to look
over to your left for me.
I see an opportunity of
possibly making a fire later.
Um, you see those kind of dead
dry stalks sticking up
out of the ground?
PAUL ARCHER: Over here?
CLIFF HODGES: Yeah.
So that’s prince’s plume.
That’s a kind of plant out here
that we can use later for a fire
by friction. You ever made a
fire by friction?
PAUL ARCHER: I’ve never
made fire by friction.
CLIFF HODGES: Find the biggest,
straightest one you can find.
PAUL ARCHER: All right.
CLIFF HODGES: Um, not a
lot of these out here,
so you don’t wanna
smash this one.
You can use your knife
to cut it at the base,
and then also scrape off
all the leaves
so you have one straight stick.
PAUL ARCHER: All right.
Copy that.
CLIFF HODGES: That hand drill
stalk was a lucky find.
There’s not a lot of great fire
by friction material out here,
and that’s gonna be a quick,
easier method of fire.
I hope he knows how
important it is.
PAUL ARCHER: Ooh.
CLIFF HODGES: Hey, Paul,
I got to ask you, uh,
kind of a personal question?
PAUL ARCHER: Go ahead.
CLIFF HODGES: Do you
use knives very often?
PAUL ARCHER: I, I do, but
not this kind of knife.
I use kitchen knives.
CLIFF HODGES: On the inside,
there’s a little thin piece
of metal, and it flips out
and locks it in place,
and you push that off to the
side so that you can fold
the knife back down.
PAUL ARCHER: Ha-ha. I got it.
Thanks.
CLIFF HODGES: Yeah.
If you’re having trouble
getting that in your pack,
you can also just
carry it in your hand.
PAUL ARCHER: All right.
Copy that.
[Blows]
CLIFF HODGES: Let’s go ahead and
head west up that sand dune.
We’ve got about seven hours left
to get to your overnight spot,
and that’s really important,
because we got to get there
with enough time to build a
shelter and start a fire.
This high elevation, high
desert gets cold at night.
While it’s uncommon, storms
out here do happen as well.
I wanna make sure you’re
protected from the elements.
ANDREW MILICH: So
it’s a little hot.
I’m sweating.
I’ve been climbing a
serious mountain just now.
I’m trying to conserve water.
I think that’s the
hardest thing–thirst.
I’m sure I’m gonna
lose weight from sweat.
Happy for it.
ALEX COKER: Andrew,
do you hear me?
ANDREW MILICH: I do.
It’s definitely hot out here.
I can feel the elevation
change, that’s for sure.
ALEX COKER: The sun being out,
those snakes decide to get out
there and lay out and sun bathe
a little bit
so they can get warmed up.
So this would be a perfect time
for us to possibly catch
some dinner. You see what I’m
saying?
ANDREW MILICH: I got you.
I’m all about it.
ALEX COKER: Uh, look for a
rock, something you can find.
Look, look to your right.
Try–keep turning around.
Look to your right.
Yeah, grab that one.
All right. Start looking around,
uh, up–underneath some rocks.
Are you afraid of snakes?
ANDREW MILICH: No.
ALEX COKER: What do you fear?
ANDREW MILICH: My wife. [Laughs]
ALEX COKER: Just be looking
around. Be very cautious,
because there could be
a rattler around here,
all right?
ANDREW MILICH: I got a snake
in front of me right here.
ALEX COKER: All right. Be
careful. It could be poisonous.
Be careful.
Aim for the head, aim for the
head, don’t get too close.
Don’t let it–don’t let
it stab you in the leg.
Grab it by the neck.
ANDREW MILICH: Oww.
ALEX COKER: Be careful.
What kind of pupils
does it have?
ANDREW MILICH: It’s
got black eyes.
Uh, brown pupils.
ALEX COKER: Okay. Are the pupils
circular or are they cat eyes?
ANDREW MILICH:
They are circular.
ALEX COKER: What about the head?
Is the head diamond or
is it slim like the body?
ANDREW MILICH: It’s
slim like the body.
ALEX COKER: Yeah,
that’s a blow snake.
These snakes are often confused
with rattlers because
of their similar brown and
tan color scheme.
But they’re harmless to humans,
so you’re gonna be okay.
That’s an awesome
job, awesome find.
Is it dead or is it still alive?
ANDREW MILICH: No,
it’s still alive.
ALEX COKER: All right. Step…
put your foot
on top of its head,
and make sure you got a
good, uh good hold on it.
ANDREW MILICH: Uh, he’s dead.
ALEX COKER: Go ahead and, uh,
if you can, take your pack off.
There should be a
knife in your pack.
Uh, pull that knife out.
If the snake was poisonous, the
poison gland
of a poisonous snake is right
inside its head.
So normally I tell
people to cut, uh,
approximately an inch and a
half, two inches behind the neck
just to be safe.
ANDREW MILICH: Uh,
let’s bite the head off.
ALEX COKER: If you’re
that bad, go for it.
I want to see you do it.
[Laughs] Oh, yeah.
You are the freaking man.
Dude, I am impressed.
I think we’ve rattled
something primal out of you.
ANDREW MILICH: It, it
bit me, so I bit it back.
All right.
ALEX COKER: All right. Once
you’re, uh, rucked up,
let’s move out.
I can’t believe he just
bit the head off a snake.
He’s got a warrior mindset.
He’s gonna do well.
But guess what, that’s
not his only troubles.
We still got to find water,
and that’s gonna be the real
challenge out here.
CLIFF HODGES: Paul, between
the boulder field and the sand
dunes, you’ve faced some pretty
tough obstacles today.
What are you thinking now?
PAUL ARCHER: I’m
connecting right now.
Spending all of this time out
here is making me think
I mean, I’m very close to my
family, with my mom, my dad,
my brother and my
sister as well.
And, you know, I see all of the
kids all on their laptops and
computers, so this is something
I can definitely recommend,
spend time in the, the
wilderness and connect.
CLIFF HODGES: That’s awesome to
hear, man. I like that.
PAUL ARCHER: I got
something, my first animal.
CLIFF HODGES: What did you find?
PAUL ARCHER: A lizard.
CLIFF HODGES: Two of the most
common lizards out here are
the whiptail and the desert
spiny,
because they love this arid
environment.
Both are edible,
but they move quick.
You think you can catch it?
PAUL ARCHER: Uh, it–I was
trying to go for some meat
tonight.
CLIFF HODGES: Paul, I
got news for you, man.
That lizard is meat.
PAUL ARCHER: [Sighs] Okay.
I got a lizard.
CLIFF HODGES: Hold that lizard
up to the camera for me, Paul.
Yeah, with that slender
body and tan color,
I’m thinking it’s a whiptail.
Desert spinies are bulkier.
I do want you to
kill the lizard.
You can break its neck, put it
in your pack
so we can eat it later.
But I just wanna make sure that
you’re not taking this lightly
and that you say your thanks
and give your gratitude.
We don’t ever wanna just
kill anything for no reason.
PAUL ARCHER: This is food, but
I’m grateful for the lizard’s
life so I can survive.
CLIFF HODGES: Let’s finish the
sacrifice there and then
go ahead and throw the
lizard in your pack.
PAUL ARCHER: All right.
Copy that.
CLIFF HODGES: Good job, man.
You got yourself dinner.
ALEX COKER: Hey, Andrew, I think
now’s a good time to break up
the snake and gut it.
ALEX COKER: We don’t want it
to spoil in your bag
from the hot sun.
ANDREW MILICH: Yeah. I’m ready.
I don’t–I don’t want
the meat to go bad.
ALEX COKER: You see
my camera there?
ANDREW MILICH: Yes, it’s a copy.
ALEX COKER: Well, what I want
you to do first is go ahead
and check off the face cam and,
uh, switch that off, then, uh,
uh, pick up the snake
and do your business.
ANDREW MILICH: Oh, dinner.
Any trick to skinning
it in a certain way?
ALEX COKER: I usually, yeah,
take my knife and I go down the,
uh, the belly.
Be careful not to, uh, cut open
the guts as you’re doing so.
ANDREW MILICH: It
comes off real easy.
ALEX COKER: Yeah. They–yeah,
the skin, you start peel…
pulling at it and the rest of it
will pull off…
there you go.
ANDREW MILICH: That’s all
edible meat right there.
ALEX COKER: Yes, sir. As far as
the, the meat goes,
you throw it in the pack,
what you wanna do.
And, uh, as far as
cleaning up your hands,
you grab some dirt and sand and
rub it in your hands
several different times to
get the funk and goo off of it.
All right.
Let’s try to get to
your overnight site,
get a shelter built, and
get that fire started.
We’re gotta try and
find some water.
ANDREW MILICH: That sounds about
as refreshing as I’ve ever heard
right now. I’d love some water.
PAUL ARCHER: I don’t know how
many hours I’ve been out here,
but, um, it was all
fun and games at first.
It seemed real when I had
to look for some food.
Um, I’m, I’m thankful
for the food.
I’ll check back in with
you guys in a minute.
CLIFF HODGES: Paul, do you
notice much of anything
about your environment?
Has it changed at all since
you’ve been out here?
PAUL ARCHER: It has.
Some clouds came out,
little more windier too.
CLIFF HODGES: Yeah. The wind’s
picking up.
PAUL ARCHER: Yeah. It’s getting
really windy.
CLIFF HODGES: I’m starting
to feel it over here too.
We definitely wanna–gonna get
you to shelter up because
we can be looking at a big
storm,
a lot of dust, and high winds.
If that happens,
we could get lost,
you could end up not finding
a good place to shelter.
Try to find a place
to, uh, hunker down.
You need to find some kind of
temporary shelters
in these boulders, like a
channel or a cave.
PAUL ARCHER: Copy that.
CLIFF HODGES: Okay. Paul, let’s
just sit tight for a moment
while we see how this works out.
PAUL ARCHER: We still good?
CLIFF HODGES: There is a chance
we could just get the
edge of it.
Give it a few more minutes then
we might be safe to press on.
ALEX COKER: Okay Andrew, you’re
about six hours in now.
I think we can start looking
for an overnight spot.
Wait a minute. Hold up.
Look over there to your left.
Do you see that big tree
over there in the corner?
ANDREW MILICH: I do.
ALEX COKER: That looks
like a cottonwood.
Usually, when you find a tree
like that that’s a lot taller
than all the others, that means
it’s sucking up some water,
and there should
be some down there.
I like to call it
the tree of life.
ANDREW MILICH: Let’s get down
to it is what I’m thinking.
ALEX COKER: Sounds like a good
place to possibly
camp out, right?
ANDREW MILICH: Yeah, there’s a
ledge right here
that I could come down all the
way through.
It looks like there’s
a game trail almost.
I’d love to find water.
That’s a huge tree.
It’s nice and shaded,
I’ll tell you that much.
ALEX COKER: You see that
white powder on the ground?
That’s calcium sulfate
from the ground water.
That’s another really good sign
that there’s water beneath
the surface here.
Try to find something
to dig with.
What in the world
you got in your hand?
ANDREW MILICH: Dry bones.
It seems like what
my life is right now.
Perfect shovel.
ALEX COKER: All right. You get
the tree of life.
Find an open area
and start digging.
ANDREW MILICH: Ha!
I don’t know if I’m gonna get
two feet deep in this crap.
[Pants]
ALEX COKER: Yeah,
calm down because, uh,
you’re sweating out there.
I see it dripping.
ANDREW MILICH: There is no way
I’m going two feet on this.
I can barely get six inches.
This stuff is rock.
CLIFF HODGES: Paul, it sounds
like the wind has died down
out there.
I think we only caught
the edge of that storm.
Let’s go see if
the coast is clear.
PAUL ARCHER: Copy.
CLIFF HODGES: So it looks
like you’re in luck here.
I think that storm is moving
out and heading down
the other canyon.
I think we’re in the
clear at this point.
With that time we lost,
it’s crucial we pick
up the pace here.
Let’s get to your overnight
spot. Keep moving west.
How are you feeling, Paul?
You seem to be walking
a little slower.
PAUL ARCHER: I’m getting hungry.
Energy’s down.
I see water.
CLIFF HODGES: What did you say?
PAUL ARCHER: I see water.
CLIFF HODGES: You see water?
…uh, let me see that.
Can you get close and get
down and look at it, please?
Can you hold your hands in a
prayer position in front
of your face and thank God you
found some water out here?
PAUL ARCHER: Uh, how do
you if this water is safe?
CLIFF HODGES: The only source we
have are the thunderstorms
that move in in the afternoon,
so I feel really okay about you
drinking this water.
So I’m gonna give you the
go-ahead to go ahead
and drink that.
PAUL ARCHER: Um, I don’t
want any of that water.
CLIFF HODGES: You
don’t like that water?
What is it about that water that
makes you not wanna drink it?
PAUL ARCHER: It’s really gritty.
CLIFF HODGES: Dehydration starts
occurring with even just
a one percent reduction in body
weight due to water loss.
You’re not a very big guy, Paul,
and you’ve been
sweating all day.
You could reach that one percent
tonight and you’ll be dizzy
and confused building your
shelter.
PAUL ARCHER: I, I prefer
not to, and I won’t.
CLIFF HODGES: I can’t
believe this guy.
Alright, man, it’s your call.
ANDREW MILICH: I tell you what.
I am ready for that
sun to come down.
ALEX COKER: We’re at
your overnight spot,
but we still need that sun
to get your fire going.
ANDREW MILICH: Roger that.
That’s what I’m talking about.
ALEX COKER: Let’s talk about
all the different ways to, uh,
start a fire.
ANDREW MILICH: Let me think
about it for a second.
I could pray for it and…
ALEX COKER: What, what do
you have already on you?
ANDREW MILICH: I
still got a knife.
It’s got some guts on it.
And I got snake in there.
Oh. Oh.
I got a light right here.
Big flashlight.
ALEX COKER: Put your
helmet back on for me.
You’ve got your fire to blast
within your hand, brother.
ANDREW MILICH: But how am I
gonna capture the sun in that?
ALEX COKER: Get a small, little,
tiny, uh, aimed point of that,
uh, sunlight beamed
in on your best,
finest tinder you
put down in there.
Once you get a nice
little coal going,
then we can put that inside a
bird’s nest
that you would
have already made.
You drop your coal into that
bird’s nest and then, uh,
let that thing
burst into flames.
ANDREW MILICH: That sounds
like a real good plan.
ALEX COKER: Put all the tinder
right there in the hole,
and then aim all your, uh, every
bit of your focus
right in the middle.
ANDREW MILICH: Here we go. I’m
shielding the wind
as much as I can.
Plastic’s getting warm.
I can tell you that much.
ALEX COKER: All right. Keep
playing around with the angles
to get the right angle.
You’ll know it because
it’ll start smoking.
ANDREW MILICH:
Primitive right here.
Nothing yet.
Here we go. I got smoke.
ALEX COKER: All right. That’s
what I’m talking about.
ANDREW MILICH: That’s crazy.
ALEX COKER: Slowly slide that
coal out into the bird’s nest.
ANDREW MILICH: Okay.
ALEX COKER: With that coal,
you got to be very careful.
You got to nurture it.
There you go.
Come on, keep blowing.
Come on.
Don’t smother it either.
Be careful.
You have fire, sir.
[Laughs] [Claps] Dude, awesome
job, man, awesome.
If your family can see
you right now, man,
they’d be so proud of you.
ANDREW MILICH: It’s the coolest
thing I’ve ever done, man.
Now, I know what to
do when I’m camping.
ALEX COKER: You make
this stuff look easy.
ANDREW MILICH: Fire.
I got dinner.
Now, if I had water, I’d be at
the flipping Bahamas
at this point.
PAUL ARCHER: So I
found some water,
but I’m not drinking the water.
So I’m just gonna go the rest
of the time without water,
challenge myself. Hmm.
I guess I’m gonna learn
and see if I can do that.
Flies everywhere out here, man.
I’m, I’m doing this for y’all.
I’m gonna make it.
I promise you.
CLIFF HODGES: All right, do you
still have your hand drill stalk
that you harvested?
PAUL ARCHER: [Gasps]
[Grunts] I failed.
I don’t have it.
CLIFF HODGES: Um, okay.
Well, Paul, you’re eight hours
into your journey here
and on the top of a mesa.
We still have an
hour and a half walk
to the lower valley and your
best overnight spot.
Without that hand drill stalk,
you’re not gonna be able to get
a quick fire.
All the material around here
is gonna lend itself
to much lengthier fire by
friction processes.
I think your best bet is to
stay here, find a shelter spot,
and starting working.
You have just enough sunlight
left to get something built
that’s gonna keep you warm
overnight without fire.
PAUL ARCHER: All right.
Copy that.
CLIFF HODGES: What’s down there?
That looks like a
nice protected bowl.
Can you get down there?
PAUL ARCHER: Uh, okay.
[Grunts]
CLIFF HODGES: Do you feel
the wind at all?
PAUL ARCHER: Nope.
CLIFF HODGES: Yeah, I think
that’s–this is, like,
like the most protected
spot I see.
All right, man. Well, we’re
gonna get started
on building your shelter.
I wanna start collecting logs
and leaning them diagonally
against the wall
there on that ledge,
creating a shelter that’s gonna
go right over the top of you,
kind of in a triangle shape.
PAUL ARCHER: Okay.
CLIFF HODGES: You got to make
sure it’s long enough
that you’re gonna be able
to fit underneath it,
but not a lot bigger, so there’s
not a lot of extra air in there
for your body to heat.
We want tons of them.
You’re gonna have to
scour this whole area.
PAUL ARCHER: Okay.
[Pants].
Ugh.
[Panting] [Grunting]
CLIFF HODGES: How
are you doing, Paul?
You getting tired?
PAUL ARCHER: Yeah, so I
might have to take a break.
CLIFF HODGES: But, uh, we’ve got
to get this shelter built, man.
It is going to get cold tonight.
PAUL ARCHER: Yeah.
I might take a nap. I’m going to
go to sleep.
ALEX COKER: We’ll pull
that snake meat out.
We’ll cut that snake meat into,
uh, small little, uh, chunks.
Uh, you need to, use, use like a
flat rock to put the snake on,
and put it near the fire, right
there near the edge to cook
the snake meat very slowly.
ANDREW MILICH: All right. I got
like a little sushi bar going on
right here.
ALEX COKER: So what’s going
through your mind
about not having any real,
true water sources?
ANDREW MILICH: Well, that
kind of sucks actually,
if you really wanna
know the truth.
All right. That’s a lot.
I wish I had a sip
of water about now.
ALEX COKER: The next time you
think that you’re thirsty
you can think back to these
hard, tough times and realize
that you actually weren’t that
thirsty as you are right now.
ANDREW MILICH: That is true.
ALEX COKER: All right. Go ahead
and check on that,
uh, snake meat.
Make sure you didn’t overcook
it, and it’s not undercooked,
give a little bite.
ANDREW MILICH: A little raw.
ALEX COKER: How does
blow snake taste?
ANDREW MILICH: Blow snake blows.
PAUL ARCHER: (Bleep).
CLIFF HODGES: All right, Paul.
How are you doing, buddy?
Talk to me.
PAUL ARCHER: I pulled something
on my right side of my back.
CLIFF HODGES: I’m sorry
to hear that, man.
I know it’s rough.
I know this is kind of
way out of your element.
I wanna take care
of you here, man.
I wanna make sure
you get through this.
And I think the biggest problem
at this point is that
you’re dehydrated.
I know you said you
didn’t want water earlier,
but we at least have to get
some calories into your system.
The lizard, um, I know
you still got that thing,
and given the fact that you lost
your hand drill stalk
and we don’t really have
a quick fire,
consider eating that raw lizard.
PAUL ARCHER: I,
I’d rather starve.
CLIFF HODGES: This kind of goes
against the way I work out here.
You killed a lizard, man.
I’m not gonna let you just
kill that thing for no reason.
I think you at least
got to try to eat it.
PAUL ARCHER: But I
won’t eat a raw lizard.
I won’t even taste it.
I’m getting queasy
thinking about it.
CLIFF HODGES: I’m really
sorry you feel that way, man.
PAUL ARCHER: I think more
importantly is my back.
There’s been
moderate discomfort.
CLIFF HODGES: What do you think
the mechanism of injury was?
PAUL ARCHER: I don’t know.
CLIFF HODGES: And what do
you think needs to be done?
PAUL ARCHER: Obviously
there’s no ice out here,
and the sun’s going down.
It’s gonna get nightfall
pretty soon. [Sighs]
So, I’m pretty much…
I don’t know.
CLIFF HODGES: Got it.
I hear you, man.
You see that orange button on
your shoulder strap there?
If you feel like this just isn’t
doable for you, you push that,
and I’ll send an evac
team to come get you.
I got to tell you, that’s
a one-way ticket, man.
You said you were coming
out here for your family,
to show them that you could
connect with nature and unplug.
This is a once in a lifetime
experience to learn about
yourself and nature.
Don’t give it up now, man.
You’ll always
regret it if you do.
PAUL ARCHER: (Bleep).
Copy that.
Whoo.
So, I feel like a bitch.
Well, I think I’m done.
Talk to y’all soon.
Pray for me.
I’m done.
CLIFF HODGES: Just hang tight.
They’re gonna get
you out of there.
The evacuation
team is on its way.
This was his chance to do…
…everything that he talked
about, connect with nature.
He found water, food.
He was so stuck on being
comfortable
that he couldn’t come out here
and release.
ANDREW MILICH: Well, ooh,
my lips got funk all over.
This is dry goodness
right there.
I’m tired. It’s been a long day.
I’d like just a reprieve,
from the thirst.
Survival is, uh… [Spits]
not an easy deal.
ALEX COKER: Well, uh, you’re
gonna need some bedding.
That ground is gonna suck
all your body heat out.
And also, you wanna think about
fire reflectors to point
and direct all that heat
back on you, uh,
for when it gets colder tonight.
ANDREW MILICH: I can feel the
energy in my muscles
just weaker without water.
Water has been the pain.
ALEX COKER: Man, I thought for
sure you were gonna find water
underneath that cottonwood
tree down the ground.
But you know what?
That’s how it happens sometimes.
ANDREW MILICH:
It’s getting dark.
This makes me wanna just sit
down and relax at this point.
ALEX COKER: Your bedding
and your fire looks good.
The sun’s about to drop.
I think it’s fine. Let’s call it
a night.
PAUL ARCHER: [Groans]
MAN: We’re gonna go
take a ride, man.
Let’s get you out of here.
PAUL ARCHER: Okay.
Hey, Cliff.
CLIFF HODGES: I’m sorry to
meet you like this, man.
PAUL ARCHER: No problem, man.
CLIFF HODGES: Yeah.
PAUL ARCHER: Yeah.
CLIFF HODGES: How are you doing?
CLIFF HODGES: Right, yeah.
PAUL ARCHER: So…
CLIFF HODGES: You got to
take care of yourself. Some…
you know that’s, that’s
what the evac button’s for, man.
Sometimes (bleep) happens
and you got to push it.
CLIFF HODGES: Paul’s a
victim of our modern society.
We’ve so separated ourselves
from the wilderness that
we’ve robbed Paul and millions
and millions of people of their
birthright as animals on this
planet to walk the landscape
and take care of themselves.
That’s why I do what I do.
I do it to hopefully reconnect
them with nature so that
we can actually take better care
of this place
instead of being afraid of it.
ANDREW MILICH: It
is a humbling deal.
You don’t rely on anybody but
yourself right now and pray.
I mean, that’s it.
You pray you find water.
You pray you start a fire.
I mean you may have skills,
but it’s not up to you,
it’s what–it’s
what you’re given,
it’s just things that you find.
I’m–I’m thirsty enough
to be tempted to give up.
ALEX COKER: It’s early morning.
How are you feeling?
ANDREW MILICH: Tired.
I slept for about, on and off,
for probably a total of
three hours,
so that was pretty good.
ALEX COKER: All right. You need
to make your way
towards the extraction point and
be hunting for water
along the way.
You’re gonna need to get over a
base of a mountain
and then trek over some dry
flats to get there.
We’ve got about an eight to
ten-hour walk ahead of us.
So you know what to do.
Embrace the suck,
ruck up, and move out.
ANDREW MILICH: Nothing
much around here.
ALEX COKER: You sound
like a pretty smart guy,
like you know what you’re doing,
and you know as well as I do
there’s not water
on top of here.
So we’re definitely gonna have
to, uh, creep back down, uh,
a little lower.
ANDREW MILICH: Copy that.
There’s a deep depression
right over here,
like a gathering
place for water.
Ooh. Wow. Check this out.
Yeah, that’s a pretty, pretty
good drop right there,
so I’m thinking it’s
something right here.
ALEX COKER: All right.
Well, here’s the situation.
That’s about an 80-foot drop.
You can walk around this, but
that could take days
because there’s no true path
down or you can rappel
and be down there in minutes.
But you’re mentally and
physically fatigued
from dehydration, which makes
this rappelling
more dangerous on your own.
So my question is how
badly do you wanna go home?
ANDREW MILICH: No. Let’s finagle
something to get down right now.
ALEX COKER: Have you ever
done any type of rappelling?
ANDREW MILICH: [Chuckles]
Just at the health club.
ALEX COKER: If you do not do
exactly what I tell you to do,
that rope’s gonna come slipping
off and you’re gonna fall
to your death.
That’s how serious this is.
ANDREW MILICH: Yeah. That’s
pretty serious.
ALEX COKER: I want to have you
take off your left lower pants.
Uh, that’s gonna be your
glove for your brake hand.
ANDREW MILICH: This is crazy.
ALEX COKER: You wanted to
challenge yourself. This is it.
Go ahead and pull out the rope.
We’re gonna do the,
uh, Swiss Seat.
It’s the same seat that the
Army air assault school uses.
Put both of the ends together.
Take each end of the rope and
wrap it around your waist.
Take your left hand and wrap
that rope around the right.
Now, pull it through.
I want you to take that rope
in your right hand
and loop it up underneath
that hole.
Copy?
ANDREW MILICH: Yeah.
ALEX COKER: Pull it tight.
This is your life on the line,
so this is very important.
You’re the one tying this thing.
ANDREW MILICH: Yeah. That’s what
scares me.
ALEX COKER: Next thing
I need you to do,
just squat down and reach with
your right hand behind your leg
and grab that rope,
that right rope,
and then wrap it around over
the rope that’s around your,
your back.
You’re right-handed, so that
means you’re gonna be
a right hand brake hand.
Take your right hand and wrap
that rope around towards
the left side.
Yup. Now, pull that through.
Congratulations. Awesome job.
ANDREW MILICH:
Thank you very much.
ALEX COKER: Now, we’re gonna go
ahead and tie, to tie
an anchor system.
ANDREW MILICH: I
see a big tree here.
ALEX COKER: We want the trunk.
Now, what we’re about to tie is
what they call a figure-eight
knot in the rope.
Now, squeeze it tight.
Take that end, retrace
that line right there.
ANDREW MILICH: Okay.
That ain’t right.
[Groans]
ALEX COKER: Make sure
you have faith in your anchor.
ANDREW MILICH: It
ain’t going anywhere.
ALEX COKER: Let me take a look
and make sure you’re good to go.
It looks like it’s gonna hold.
Great job, brother.
ANDREW MILICH: Oh. That’s pretty
far down.
ALEX COKER: Yes, it is.
ANDREW MILICH: [Chuckles] I’m
pretty nervous about this.
I’m not gonna kid you.
ALEX COKER: This is
serious business.
There’s, there’s no
getting around it.
So if you wanna say
a prayer out loud,
this would be the time to do it.
ANDREW MILICH: [Sighs] Father,
just let me get down safe,
let me get to some water, and,
uh, just get me to solid ground.
Amen.
ALEX COKER: Slowly walk down.
Slow.
ANDREW MILICH: I
don’t know about this.
ALEX COKER: Take your time.
Take your time.
Lean forward.
There you go. Lock your legs
out.
Get, keep your feet in place.
ANDREW MILICH: Oh, man.
ALEX COKER: You’re doing great.
ANDREW MILICH: Whoo.
ALEX COKER: You’re doing great.
ANDREW MILICH: Whoo.
ALEX COKER: Keep it up.
Keep it up.
Just take your time.
Keep your feet in place.
Don’t move, don’t move
your feet anymore.
Use that improvised hand brake,
but don’t go getting
crazy with it.
ANDREW MILICH: Whoo.
ALEX COKER: Keep it up.
Keep it up.
Watch your hands.
There you go. Slide it down.
ANDREW MILICH: [Pants]
ALEX COKER: You’re almost
there. You’re doing awesome.
You’re doing awesome.
ANDREW MILICH: I’m on
the ground. I’m on the ground!
ALEX COKER: You did it, brother!
You did it! Woo!
ANDREW MILICH: [Huffs] Whoo!
ALEX COKER: That’s awesome.
ANDREW MILICH: Oh, man. That was
scary.
Oh, look at this.
Huge cavern, a lot of holes.
I’m so excited.
I found nothing.
It’s dry, but I’m looking.
Most of it it’s dry out…
Nothing much around here.
ALEX COKER: Do you feel down?
ANDREW MILICH: I could always
use a pick me up. I’m tired.
ALEX COKER: Okay. Go ahead and
make a right face.
Man, it’s been a long day and
we haven’t found any water.
But do you see that little green
bush that kind of looks like
a tiny little cactus
with no needles?
ANDREW MILICH: Oh,
yeah, right here.
ALEX COKER: Okay.
That’s called an ephedra plant.
Do you know anything
about ephedra?
ANDREW MILICH: Yeah,
it makes you yippity.
ALEX COKER: Just rip it off,
bite into it, start chewing.
Go manly.
I need everything I
can get out of you.
So I’m using nature to my
advantage because I promise you,
this is gonna be a
serious challenge.
ANDREW MILICH: Copy that.
ALEX COKER: You’ve been over
gravel hills, a desert valley,
you rappelled the jagged
cliff of a mountain base,
and you spent the last five
hours across the dry flats.
You are now close to
your extraction point.
The only problem is that I got
to head out to meet you there.
I have a radio on me, but that
means I won’t have any eyes
on you the rest of the way.
In order to get out there,
you got to know, uh,
a certain pace count.
Uh, so I’m gonna teach you how
to do a pace count to, uh,
walk out to that location.
Does that make sense?
ANDREW MILICH: Copy that.
ALEX COKER: All right.
But everyone is,
is, is different.
So what I’m gonna have you do,
every time your left foot hits
the ground,
that’s a number until you
get to your stop point.
Makes sense?
ANDREW MILICH: Copy that.
Makes total sense.
ALEX COKER: Start
walking and counting.
I’ll tell you when to stop
when you’re at approximately
a hundred meters.
ANDREW MILICH: One, two,
three…twenty-seven,
twenty-eight,
twenty-nine…sixty-five,
sixty-six, sixty-seven,
sixty-eight.
ALEX COKER: Okay. Stop.
You just passed a
hundred meter mark.
Where does that put
you on your count?
ANDREW MILICH: That
puts me at 68 paces.
ALEX COKER: All right. That’s
sounds about right.
I’m gonna make this easy on you.
Directly in front
of you is north.
I want you heading in that
direction
for approximately 250 meters.
Then you’re gonna make a left
turn going west
for a hundred meters.
Then you’re gonna make a hard
right turn going back north
for approximately 250 meters.
You should end up on
the top of a mesa.
That’s where I’m gonna meet you.
But if you’re not
in the right place,
there’s a possibility you’re
gonna be here overnight.
ANDREW MILICH: Copy that.
ALEX COKER: I’m gonna
jump on the Razor.
I’m gonna come looking for you.
ANDREW MILICH: Hopefully
I’ll see you soon.
ALEX COKER: All right, brother.
Make it happen.
ANDREW MILICH: One,
two, three, four.
[Pants] Forty-five.
ALEX COKER: What’s
your pace count?
ANDREW MILICH: It’s forty-six,
forty-seven, forty-eight.
ALEX COKER: Are
you okay, Andrew?
You’re, you’re
sounding real bad.
ANDREW MILICH: I
just need some water.
I’m getting tired.
ALEX COKER: Dude, please
don’t fall out on me.
ANDREW MILICH: Are
we almost done?
ALEX COKER: Almost done, dude.
Just keep driving on.
Keep pushing.
ANDREW MILICH: Five, six.
I’m not sure which
way to go right now.
ALEX COKER: How many meters
have you walked so far?
ANDREW MILICH: I, I–honestly–I
cannot tell you that answer.
ALEX COKER: That
is not good at all.
ANDREW MILICH: No. It’s not good
at all.
I would say I’m probably
250 meters out right now.
It looks like a path
that goes up on my left.
ALEX COKER: I hope
that’s the right one.
Keep track of it this time.
ANDREW MILICH:
One, two, three…
sixteen, seventeen.
I guess I’m just
gonna have to climb.
I’m kind of at a dead end
right here. [Sighs]
ALEX COKER: How bad
do you want out of here?
ANDREW MILICH: I want
to get out of here.
ALEX COKER: No. I wanna freaking
hear a heart of warrior
coming out of you right now.
Tell me how bad you wanna get
out of here and get extracted.
ANDREW MILICH: I want
to get out of here.
I want some water.
ALEX COKER: You wanted
to challenge yourself,
so here it is.
I’m getting off comms now.
It’s up to you to make it to
the rally point on your own.
Get focused and get
your mindset right.
ANDREW MILICH: Let’s do this.
One, two, three, four, five,
six, seven…
two fifty. I counted out two
hundred.
That’s gotta be right here.
Two fifty. It’s got to be.
Alex!
Alex!
Hey!
ALEX COKER: [Laughs]
There he is.
ANDREW MILICH: Yeah! [Laughs]
Baby!
Woo.
Over here.
Woohoo!
Woo. [Laughs]
Yeah!
Woo!
[Panting]
ALEX COKER:
Awesome job, brother!
ANDREW MILICH: Hi.
ALEX COKER: [Laughs]
ANDREW MILICH: [Panting]
This is heavenly right here.
ALEX COKER: I got tons of
it, as much as you want.
You accomplished the challenge.
ANDREW MILICH: You get out
here, it’s a whole new world.
I mean, it’s a matter
of life and death.
I proved that I, you know, my,
my mind is and my heart
is stronger than my body.
I feel good, you know.
I, I think I
accomplished something.
I feel proud of, of what I did.
I can’t wait for my
wife to watch this,
’cause I can elbow
her and say, Yeah,
I can do what I see on
TV, ’cause I just did it.
ALEX COKER: I’ve got
ultimate respect for you.
ANDREW MILICH: [Laughs]
ALEX COKER: You by far have a
warrior spirit.
Congratulations, brother.
ANDREW MILICH: Thank you, man.
I appreciate it.
ALEX COKER: Andrew had
a warrior-type mindset.
He had to embrace the suck,
ruck up, and drive on attitude,
and that’s what it takes
to survive out here.
ANDREW MILICH: Woohoo!

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