Tactical Flashlight Scam How Can One Shop

NARRATOR: For every
person, there’s a moment.
ROGER DOUGAN: My wife and
I lost our home to a fire.
NARRATOR: When they
discover that the world.
CINDY STEWART: When the second
plane hit, it changed me.
NARRATOR: And everything
they hold dear.
PATRICK TROY: They placed
in my arms my first son.
CHUCK VESSEY: Tornado on the
ground, phone lines were down.
WOMAN: It’s suicide.
NARRATOR: Can be taken away.
PATRICK TROY: And that’s
why I’m a prepper.
LISA ROULETTE: That’s
why I’m a prepper.
CURTIS WAGGONER: And
that’s why I am a prepper.
JACK HOUSTON: Need to cover.
NARRATOR: While some
hope for the best.
JIM LEBUS: This is a little
bit more than I expected.
Jesus [bleep].
NARRATOR: These three are
preparing for the worst.
(Coughing)
SURVIVOR JANE: I can’t breathe!
NARRATOR: They are
Doomsday Preppers.
RICK AUSTIN: We were
living the American dream.
We had a beautiful house in
a beautiful neighborhood.
Then suddenly people who own
homes in our neighborhood
were foreclosed on
or they had to rent out
to multiple families. So,
we had four or five families
living in a single home
and it wasn’t long after that
that the crime went up in the
neighborhood
and we suddenly had the
sheriff helicopters flying
over our house at 3:00 in the
morning with spotlights
in our backyard.
SURVIVOR JANE: But I would say
that the straw that broke
the camel’s back was when I was
leaving work one day
and pulling out of the parking
garage,
two men with guns came up to
my car and tried to carjack me.
They had just robbed
somebody at gunpoint.
That’s when I’d had enough.
It was broad daylight.
There were people walking
up and down the sidewalk.
Nobody was coming to help me.
And that’s when I
became a prepper.
RICK AUSTIN: My wife and I
built a home
high in the Appalachian
Mountains
so that marauders
will never find us.
I’ve got over 15,000 gallons of
water stored in catchment tanks
and on a pond on the property.
We’ve got over 40 goats,
rabbits, chickens,
and ducks to provide us with all
the protein we will ever need.
JANE-RICK: We are preparing
for an EMP.
NARRATOR: Coronal mass ejections
are pockets of electrically
charged gas
that erupt from the sun
every day.
If these ejections impact
the earth’s atmosphere,
it can create an electromagnetic
pulse that could knock out
all electronic devices
within its range.
RICK AUSTIN: An EMP will take
out an entire power grid,
every chip, every computer,
every automobile.
Life as we know it
will no longer exist.
SURVIVOR JANE: You’re going
to have a lot of death.
The ones that have survived,
they’ve either survived because
they are prepared
or they’re the takers.
RICK AUSTIN: Society will
fall apart within days.
There won’t be any supplies
in the grocery stores.
People are gonna literally kill
each other
for what little scraps
there are.
SURVIVOR JANE: It’ll be
the good against the evil.
Only the strong will survive.
RICK AUSTIN: High ground
is the best ground to have.
It’s secluded and it makes
it more defensible
than any other piece of
property.
SURVIVOR JANE: We have
a 360 degree view.
We could see anybody
that’s coming and going.
NARRATOR: Jane and Rick left
their high-paying corporate
jobs, their home,
and their idea of the American
dream to move off the grid
and prepare for an
impending disaster.
In only four years, they have
turned fifty-three acres
of raw land into a high-yielding
prepper compound
with several natural water
sources and livestock.
RICK AUSTIN: Hi, girls. How you
doing? Who wants some alfalfa?
NARRATOR: But at the core of
their survival plan is a single
prep that will provide them with
food, medicine, sanitation,
and even defense.
RICK AUSTIN: Blackberry, pear.
NARRATOR: And it is all
hidden in plain sight.
RICK AUSTIN: After an EMP,
food’s gonna be scarce,
and that’s why we’ve created a
camouflaged food forest
that ultimately provides all the
food that you would ever need,
but it’s disguised to look
like overgrown underbrush.
SURVIVOR JANE: It’s actually a
Garden of Eden because there’s
any type of fruit that you want,
any type of berry that you want,
any type of vegetable, any
type of herb that you want,
it’s all there.
RICK AUSTIN: So any marauders or
any people that are desperately
searching for food are going to
end up passing us by
because we just don’t look like
we have any food growing here.
NARRATOR: Rick’s camouflaged
food forest
has more than 170 carefully
chosen plant species.
RICK AUSTIN: This is mustard
growing underneath an apple tree
NARRATOR: Planted in
concentric circles,
intended to mimic pre-agrarian
growing structures,
the plants share
complimentary nutrients,
so the garden has up to 5 times
the output per square inch
than a typical furrowed farm.
RICK AUSTIN: You’ve got these
little mini ecosystems
that surround a central
fruit or nut tree.
And then around that
is a shrub layer,
which are your blueberries, your
blackberries, your elderberries,
and then around that, you’ve got
medicinal herbs
or your cooking herbs.
And those actually provide a
defensive perimeter
around all your other fruit
because that is where
your predatory wasp and
pollinators reside.
So they would kill the bad bugs
that would normally be eating
your good fruit and vegetables.
I knew that I needed pollinating
insects as part
of my overall strategy.
A typical honeybee will travel
as far as five miles to find
pollen and nectar.
They don’t have to go more than
a few feet to get it
in my garden.
And more trips to the garden
ultimately relate
to more honey that they
can make.
NARRATOR: Jane and Rick have
seven beehives that produce
over 420 pounds of honey each
year.
RICK AUSTIN: Actually, different
shades of honey
based on what they were
gathering at the time.
NARRATOR: If an EMP wiped out
the industrial food chain,
their bees could provide them
with enough calories
to live for 240 days.
But their honey doesn’t
just give them food.
SURVIVOR JANE: A couple
of months after an EMP,
you’re gonna have
a lot of disease,
you’re gonna have
a lot of infection,
and cleanliness
is gonna be huge.
Hygiene is going to be
of utmost importance.
NARRATOR: And their honey can
deliver a prepper’s clean sweep.
SURVIVOR JANE: Milk and
honey, the cleanser,
it’s been around forever.
In fact, they say that Cleopatra
actually bathed
in milk and honey.
By using a teaspoon of honey
and a tablespoon of milk,
you’ve got cleanser
for your whole body.
I’ve heard a lot of people
say if an EMP happened,
that they would use
leaves for toilet paper.
To me, I looked at all of those
leaves
and they just didn’t seem like a
viable option.
NARRATOR: Stockpiling toilet
paper is expensive and takes up
space that could be used
for storing food and water.
SURVIVOR JANE: I have invented
something
that I call the Hiney Hydrant.
I like to add herbs
to my Hiney Hydrant.
I’m gonna use some
rosemary and some mint.
I have them here.
They’re plentiful
and they’re healthy.
NARRATOR: Direct contact with
fecal matter can lead
to exposure to over 200 known
pathogens including E. coli
and salmonella, which can
lead to infection
and even death.
SURVIVOR JANE: It’s a portable
bidet, or survival bidet.
And I’m just gonna put about
a cup of the combined steeped
herbs into the Hiney Hydrant.
It’s a refreshing, cooling
addition to the water.
It’s just a garden sprayer with
just a little modified hook
on the wand.
I always joke and say you can
have a full on blast
or you can have the nice summer
mist.
NARRATOR: But it’s not only
disease that Rick and Jane’s
survival garden can
help defend against.
RICK AUSTIN: We have everything
that we need here to survive.
We just need to defend this
property
when the marauders show up.
I like using thorny plants as a
defensive perimeter
because they really don’t give
away that you’ve got something
valuable behind that barrier.
But if they try to get across
then they’re gonna get torn up
with thorns.
NARRATOR: Today, Rick is
fortifying
his home security system by
adding nature’s version
of barbed wire, the Osage orange
shrub,
which has been used by
farmers
to confine livestock
since the 1800’s.
RICK AUSTIN: This is a layer of
really good soil right here.
I’m gonna test to
see how deep it is.
You can see the thorns
are pretty sharp.
And I’m gonna put some plant
food in there to start with
and mix that with the natural
soil, break it up a little bit.
This is my nitrogen rich
water from the pond.
It’s got a lot of nutrients in
it because the ducks
go to the bathroom in the pond
and so do the fish
so it’s got a lot of nitrogen in
it that’s good for the plants.
Man, those are sharp.
After an EMP, any marauder that
tries to come through this fence
is gonna end up
looking just like this.
NARRATOR: If an intruder
gets through their passive,
non-lethal first
circle of defense,
their Osage orange barbwire,
Rick and Jane have a second,
more active circle of defense.
RICK AUSTIN: If we could deliver
that pepper spray
using one of these sprayers,
just set up, you know,
by the front door so,
and we could do it in a way
that was entirely remote
so we wouldn’t have to face
them.
SURVIVOR JANE: Honestly,
you wouldn’t know.
We might have to get some more
flowers or something like that
but.
RICK AUSTIN: Yeah.
NARRATOR: A dispersal
system that will use
their garden-harvested hot
peppers
to emit an extremely potent
yet potentially fatal
homemade pepper spray.
RICK AUSTIN: The only entrance
to the house is essentially
through the front door.
But we’ve set up the sidewalk
so that essentially
it’s a kill zone.
SURVIVOR JANE: I mean,
if it worked, it would,
it’d be awesome because that
would be just like
the ultimate surprise.
RICK AUSTIN: Yup, for sure.
SURVIVOR JANE: Okay.
RICK AUSTIN: And they can’t get
past the Osage Orange because
they’re gonna be all torn up.
NARRATOR: Chili pepper heat is
measured in Scoville Heat Units.
The Trinidad Moruga Scorpion,
which Rick and Jane
grow in their garden, measures
two million S.H.U.’s,
roughly the same potency
as four hundred jalapenos,
making it one of the
world’s hottest peppers,
and the ultimate
homemade pepper spray.
RICK AUSTIN: It’s incredibly
dangerous, this stuff.
I’m wearing a mask and gloves
and goggles because
if that ever gets in your eyes
or in your nose
or in your throat, you’re done.
I’m separating the
seeds from the peppers.
I’m crushing those skins and
then mixing that with garlic
and with oil to create a
concentrate of this hot pepper.
SURVIVOR JANE: I would suggest
that you be incredibly careful
that some type of fumes or
something
doesn’t come back up on you.
RICK AUSTIN: I can definitely
tell these are the hottest
chili peppers on the planet
because I’m just dying.
We should have done this
outside. This is just bad.
SURVIVOR JANE: My
face is burning.
RICK AUSTIN: Yeah, I can
feel it through the mask.
Why don’t you, why
don’t you back up?
(Coughing) (Coughing)
SURVIVOR JANE:
Are you all right?
(Coughing) (Coughing) (Coughing)
Okay. Are you okay?
RICK AUSTIN: I guess the
smoke is just getting to me.
It’s coming right through
the mask, made me cough.
SURVIVOR JANE: I
mean, it actually,
it choked me and I
couldn’t get my breath.
SURVIVOR JANE: Uh-hmm.
This is an awesome
perimeter defense.
It is so powerful.
Can you imagine your eyes
burning out and you’re breathing
this in?
It would just totally
incapacitate somebody.
NARRATOR: If intruders make it
past the first two
non-lethal defenses,
the Osage Orange barbwire and
the Trinidad Moruga Scorpion
pepper spray, Rick and Jane’s
garden has another,
more deadly defense in bloom.
RICK AUSTIN: We’ve got a number
of plants in my garden
that are poisonous.
Foxglove is a deadly poison.
I’m picking Foxglove leaves
to save for the future
and then I will dry
them out on the screen.
NARRATOR: All parts of the
Foxglove plant are poisonous.
It can cause diarrhea,
convulsions,
and ultimately lead to death.
RICK AUSTIN: After
the leaves are dry,
we’re going to put them
in a little spice rack.
In the event that we have
some undesirable guests
staying with us in the future,
we will have Foxglove available
so that we can serve our guests
a special meal.
You know, for someone that wants
to leave their head in the sand
and think that EMP
could never happen,
they might think that someone
like myself is paranoid.
They need to start thinking
seriously and start getting
prepared because those that
are not prepared
are gonna end up being victims.
SURVIVOR JANE: If an
EMP was to strike,
you couldn’t go to a store, you
couldn’t go to a gas station,
you couldn’t go to anything.
It would be life as we
know it would cease.
A lot of people think that the
government is gonna be able
to come and give them the things
that they need
and unfortunately that’s not
gonna happen.
NARRATOR: To determine how long
you could initially survive
a catastrophe, the experts,
practical preppers,
have scored your preps in five
categories of 20 points each,
for a total possible
score of 100.
Food, your camouflaged food
forest will provide you
with a rich and diverse diet,
20 out of 20 points,
water, 18 out of 20 points,
shelter, 18 out of 20 points,
security, 15 out of 20 points.
You have created a sustainable
and fortified property
with a minimum workload required
to produce your own food,
water and electricity,
18 X factor points.
Overall, you get
an 89 out of 100.
You have 20 months
initial survival time.
RICK AUSTIN: I think
that’s a fair assessment.
There’s always things
we can do to improve.
We’re always preparing. Uhh…
The truth of the
matter is though,
no matter what the score
was, it really wouldn’t matter
because we’re not playing
some game here.
This is our life and
it’s all about prepping.
NARRATOR: The sun enters a
period of maximum
solar storm activity every 11
years.
While estimates on the odds of a
monster solar storm
occurring in the next decade
range from six to twelve
percent,
the majority of solar flares
pose no threat
to America’s power
infrastructure.
But experts are looking into
additional measures
to protect the grid.
In 1987, I experienced the
Whittier Narrows earthquake
and my apartment started
shaking.
I ran over to the TV and I was
watching people run around
confused, scared.
They didn’t know what to do
and there was an awful lot of
property damage.
Well, there was a guy that
didn’t know what to do
and he ran outside and he got
killed
by a brick wall falling on him.
I don’t wanna be this guy.
I always wanna be the guy to
know what to do whether
it’s through an earthquake or
any other type of disaster.
And that’s why I’m a prepper.
I keep more preps on my body
than most people keep
in their homes.
I live by the motto, If you
can’t buy it, build it.
I keep my food portable and
ready to go
at a moment’s notice.
I’ve created a fireball gun to
protect myself
when all hell breaks loose.
My car is equipped
for any disaster.
I’m preparing for an earthquake
that will paralyze
the West Coast.
NARRATOR: Experts
believe that the big one,
a massive quake predicted to
occur within the next century
could kill thousands and
leave even more homeless.
JIM LEBUS: The one drawback
about being in LA
during an earthquake is
we have a lot of old buildings
that are gonna collapse.
You have overpasses
that are gonna collapse,
you’re gonna have
a lot of debris,
you’re gonna lose water pressure
and there’s gonna be a lot of
fire from gas leaks.
Everybody lives so
close to each other.
If one house burns, the next
house is probably gonna burn
because the resources just are
not gonna be able
to get to every location.
LA County itself has more than
10 million people living here.
And during a major disaster,
and I, and I hate to say it,
it’s basically everybody takes
the attitude of it’s every man
for himself and every
person for himself.
And when you’re in an area when
there’s 10 million people
that in itself could be much
more of a danger
than the actual disaster itself.
I started tinkering around and
developing little toys
and stuff as a kid.
As far back as I can
remember, maybe 10 years old,
I started doing
the MacGyver stuff.
And the older you get, the more
advanced the creations become.
I’m an analyst scientist.
I get hired by companies to
analyze their products
before it goes out to market,
before it goes to the patent
office as a trouble-shooter.
I also like to invent
different devices,
things that I feel that I need
to survive disasters
or out in the wilderness, gear
for protecting your property
and even protecting yourself.
What I’m building here is
a mobile power station.
So, after a devastating
earthquake, a lot of damage,
you lose power, you
don’t have electricity,
and that’s what
this is made for.
I can plug in any
type of wall socket.
Whether it be a light,
whether it be a stove,
anything that I’m gonna
need to supply power with.
And on the top is a little
plug in here, that USB,
it recharges my communication
devices, radios.
NARRATOR: In 1994, a 6.7
magnitude quake knocked out
power in parts of Los Angeles
for two weeks
before it could be fully
repaired.
Jim believes that
after the big one,
the power might be
lost for months.
JIM LEBUS: The beauty with
this device is after a major
earthquake, there’s no
shortage of abandoned cars.
And when this battery dies,
it’s gonna be very easy for
me just to go to another car,
yank that battery.
So, it’s nothing to trade out
batteries really quick, pull it,
and get the hell out of there.
NARRATOR: Los Angeles has the
worst traffic congestion
of any American city,
averaging 90 hours of
additional time
spent each year stuck in
traffic.
Jim believes that after
a major earthquake,
these delays will turn from
inconvenience
to literal dead ends.
JIM LEBUS: The traffic is just
gonna be so thick
that you’re just not going to be
able to get anywhere.
The best bug-out vehicle to have
in LA county is either
a hot air balloon, a harrier
jet, a helicopter,
or if you live close
to the ocean, a boat.
Any other vehicle,
you’re just gonna find yourself
not being able to go anywhere.
For me, my vehicle is a tool.
For other people, their
vehicle might be a death trap.
This is the basic gear that I
carry with me in case
I can’t make it home.
NARRATOR: Jim keeps two weeks
worth of supplies in his car
at all times, so that if he
is cut off from his home,
he will be able to bug out
from anywhere in the city.
JIM LEBUS: My plan after a major
earthquake is to head up
to the hills where I can take
advantage
of the natural resources versus
being in a town
to try to get manmade
resources.
NARRATOR: This is
my bug-out bag.
Now, I’ve got food, I’ve got
first aid, extra blankets.
I’ve got a sleeping bag in here.
I’ve got material to
make a tent if I need to.
So, that’s what I would use if I
had to bug out
or if I have to stay in one
spot.
Along with the more typical
prepper supplies
found in bug-out bags,
Jim keeps several of his own
specially designed inventions
that he believes will be
vital after an earthquake.
JIM LEBUS: I design things and
I make things out of necessity.
And this here is
my walking spear.
These are locking blades, so
they’re not gonna close on you
if you’re in combat.
I’ve made accessories that you
can attach to the walking spear.
This being a claw for digging,
I can use this for self-defense.
I can reach up into a
tree, pull down a branch,
grab whatever fruits
I need to grab.
I can use this for killing
and catching animals.
The center of this is lower
than the other two forks
so I can come down and I can get
something by its neck
then I can go ahead and cut
its head off real quick.
This piece of gear is
very, very multifunctional.
You can’t go into the store and
buy a loaf of bread, or a steak,
and a walking spear.
Somebody needs to be able to
develop these things
and that person might as
well be me
because I’m gonna get the
most use out of them.
I don’t believe
that I’m paranoid.
I believe that I’m
overly prepared.
And if you don’t have it
you’re gonna die without it.
The reason for the military
look is it just scares
the [bleep] out of people.
If they think you’re some
sort of government agent,
they don’t pull guns on you.
If a disaster breaks out in
LA, I plan on being by myself,
and so I carry all
my gear with me.
I’m not really a backpacker,
I’m a body packer.
I carry enough gear to be
able to eat, purify water,
protect myself, and
build a shelter.
NARRATOR: So even though Jim
has several boxes and bags
of survival gear stored in his
car, he wears another 78 preps
weighing a total of 30
pounds at all times.
JIM LEBUS: This tube
that I carry with me,
if I need to I can suck water
out of a pool, out of a stream.
My shoelaces, this is 12 feet.
I’ve got a knife right
here, it’s just Velcro.
I’m good to go and
it’s just that quick.
I carry an ankle
knife right here.
I keep compasses, all kinds of
different ways to create fire
and multitool.
I’ve got a buck knife here.
This is my first aid kit.
I’ve got a magnifying
glass here.
Kneepads are great.
I’ve got a whistle
with a compass.
My neck knife is a whistle.
I got cordage here.
And in this small
pouch, I’ve got a knife.
This here is a wire saw.
I keep a lot of equipment on me
that a lot of people
don’t have in their house.
Disasters come with no warning.
And if you’re not prepared,
if you don’t have it,
you’re gonna die basically.
Today, he volunteered to help
his neighbor, a novice prepper,
get his home ready for an
earthquake
JIM LEBUS: I like to teach
people how to prepare themselves
for a disaster.
For every person I can show,
is one less person I have to
worry about.
Are you Dan?
DAN WALSWORTH: Yeah. Jim?
JIM LEBUS: Yeah. How are you
doing?
DAN WALSWORTH: Good. How are
you?
JIM LEBUS: All right.
What I’m gonna do is show him
the little tricks
and the little secrets of how to
be able to protect him
and his family during
and after a major earthquake.
Yeah, I could already see some
potential hazards
since I walked through the door.
DAN WALSWORTH: First
impression of Jim,
he showed up kind of
full commando gear.
I really wasn’t expecting that.
JIM LEBUS: Everybody’s
buying flat screens.
They’re not mounting them on the
walls and they’re putting them
on these stands and what happens
is this TV is a lot wider
and it’s a lot heavier than the
TV that used to be on there.
You see how unstable that is?
A lot of kids, they like to lay
on the floor in front of the TV.
During a major earthquake, it’ll
only take maybe half of a second
for this to land on them.
NARRATOR: Internationally,
magnitude 8 earthquakes
have caused deaths in the
hundreds of thousands.
JIM LEBUS: These things
aren’t anchored down.
NARRATOR: But the majority of
earthquake-related injuries
occur as a result of collapsing
walls, flying glass,
and falling objects.
JIM LEBUS: You have a hell
of a lot of glass here,
and none of this
stuff is anchored.
If it’s two, three o’clock in
the morning
and these things fall over and
everybody’s in a panic,
especially because you
have to step right here,
you’re stepping
down in a big hurry,
you’re stepping
right into glass.
You don’t necessarily have to
spend thousands of dollars
to get survival gear.
You can go to a dollar store
and pick up little finger
flashlights or glow sticks,
even a disposable camera.
I wanna show you how you can set
up a defense mechanism
on this doorknob to protect
yourself.
And what I wanna use is your
average everyday
disposable camera.
What I’m showing Dan is how to
electrify his doorknob
by using the capacitor to turn
that camera into a Taser.
So basically, inside your house,
you could touch these
doorknobs all the time,
nothing’s gonna happen.
On the other side, somebody
goes grab this doorknob,
they’re gonna get shocked
by the voltage coming out.
It’s not enough to kill them.
It’s another deterrent.
They’re gonna touch this and
they’re gonna jump
and they’re gonna move on.
NARRATOR: A typical disposable
camera photo flash
releases a 300 volt charge
at a low amperage,
making it non-lethal
when used on an adult.
JIM LEBUS: So this
doorknob is live, people.
NARRATOR: Jim’s door Taser is
designed to discharge
when a potential intruder
grabs the knob,
causing the positive and
negative leads to touch,
completing the circuit.
DAN WALSWORTH: Well, I mean, I
seen it spark but
how do you know it’s gonna
deter them?
JIM LEBUS: You wanna try it?
DAN WALSWORTH: [Bleep]
JIM LEBUS: Yeah. See?
It’s very effective, isn’t it?
Right?
DAN WALSWORTH: It
works pretty good.
JIM LEBUS: It works
pretty damn good.
I very seldom use the top of
the line survival gear
because there’s survival gear
all over the place.
Condoms are fantastic
to transport water.
They work great as a tourniquet.
If you have something
that’s perishable,
you can actually use
it inside a condom.
An average condom can hold
about three gallons of water.
NARRATOR: Earthquakes cause
disruption
to city water supplies, so in
preparation,
FEMA recommends storing one
gallon of water
per person for three days.
JIM LEBUS: This is probably a
little under a gallon of water
right here, but you could see
how much condom
I have left over.
So you can double the size or
triple the size of this condom.
DAN WALSWORTH: So you’re telling
me that that’s drinkable?
JIM LEBUS: Oh, absolutely.
DAN WALSWORTH: And safe?
JIM LEBUS: Oh, sure. Okay, I’ll
try it.
Hu! Wanna try some?
DAN WALSWORTH: I’m good, thanks.
JIM LEBUS: It’s good to go.
NARRATOR: If a substantial
earthquake hits,
stored water is vital.
But Jim still needs to
have the proper protection.
So, he invented his own
prophylactic device,
the fireball gun.
JIM LEBUS: As a deterrent
against people and animals.
A lot of the stuff
that I create,
I try to do it to
where it’s not deadly.
These are what I
call fire balls.
I try to use these through my
paintball gun and each one
has a different chemical in it.
The blue one has glycerin and
the orange one has panaganate.
To show you the effectiveness,
I wanna crack one
and the other open and we’ll let
the chemicals mix.
NARRATOR: When mixed together,
potassium permanganate and
glycerin create
an exothermic reaction causing
the two chemicals to combust.
Jim believes this would work
as an effective
non-lethal deterrent.
JIM LEBUS: I wanna show Dan how
the fireballs could be used
as a deterrent from anybody
coming into your property
or attacking you.
So this represents an attacker.
And what we’re gonna try to do
is hit it right around here
with the fireballs.
Oh, that’s beautiful.
This is what would
happen to somebody
that’s gonna be a threat.
Jesus Christ.
This is a little bit
more than I expected,
but you can see the results.
The fireballs, they’ll
take a second or two,
but once they activate,
that’s what you end up with.
Normally in practice, I’ll
fire two balls, maybe four,
to see how long it takes for the
chemicals to react and combust.
For this experiment, I went
ahead and fired 10 balls.
There is, like, absolutely
nothing left of this.
DAN WALSWORTH: This is
considered non-lethal?
JIM LEBUS: Well, I
thought it was non-lethal.
I think that preppers are
misunderstood and that people
look at them as being paranoid,
and that’s just not the
case at all.
To me, anybody that’s going to
make efforts to be prepared
for a disaster of any type,
that’s just responsibility.
NARRATOR: Jim Lebus declined
to be assessed
by practical preppers.
The U.S. Geological Service
predicts that the likelihood
of a magnitude 7 earthquake
hitting California
in the next 30 years is around
60 percent.
However, historically, rapid
police and National Guard
deployments following major
earthquakes have kept violence
and looting in check.
JACK HOUSTON: My dad had always
been a big part of my life.
He taught us how to
camp and how to fish.
Last year, after spring break,
we hadn’t been in contact
with him for about three days.
When we got home, we found his
truck in the parking lot
and we heard our dog barking,
and that was strange because we
expected him to be in an area
of the state where he wouldn’t
get cell phone service.
We ended up having to force our
way into the house
and when I came downstairs,
I found him collapsed on the
couch.
And I immediately told
my mom to call 911.
I took my brother over
to a neighbor’s house.
And by the time I got back,
the paramedics said that he
had passed away.
That was really a surreal moment
and I felt really unprepared.
And that’s when I
became a prepper.
I’ve been in Boy Scouts
since I was eleven,
and it’s given me the skills
I need to survive in the
wilderness.
If a hurricane hits, I’ll be
able bug out by road, by sea,
or by trail.
So I’ll always have a way out.
I’ve created the ultimate
teenage prepper group
with guys I’ve known since I was
six.
I’m preparing for a super storm
hurricane that will cause
extensive damage to the DC area
and cause me and my family
to have to bug out
to the wilderness.
NARRATOR: In recent years,
hurricanes have caused
an average of 12 billion
dollars a year in damage,
and displaced tens of
thousands from their homes.
Jack fears that his area will
be hit by a massive
Category 5 hurricane.
JACK HOUSTON: A large percent
of the city would be flooded,
the power grid could be out
for an unknown amount of time.
And after power and emergency
services are down
and once the food’s gone,
people are gonna start
getting desperate.
So, they might try to fight
other people for food and steal.
Since we were kids,
my dad took me and my brother
out fishing and camping.
That’s honestly what got
me started into survival.
After my dad died, that turned
into prepping so that
in the event of some other
disaster,
I would be more prepared
for it.
Here’s some of my Boy
Scout Merit Badges.
I’ve been a Boy
Scout since I was 11.
I’m currently ranked First Class
and I hope to be an Eagle Scout
within the next two years.
Wilderness survival, first
aid, emergency preparedness,
and rifle shooting.
I have a small library of
survival and outdoorsmen books.
And I read these often and they
just help me improve my skills.
One of the ways that I coped
with my dad passing away
was to make videos.
I guess it was kind of a way of
me connecting with him
and I’ve been working on
it a lot.
I made my first video about what
to put in your bug-out bag.
Binoculars.
Flashlights.
NARRATOR: During Hurricane
Sandy, nearly 2,500 accidents
and disabled vehicles blocked
the roadways
in Jack’s hometown of
Alexandria, Virginia.
So, he’s planning to bug
out ahead of the storm.
JACK HOUSTON: The federal
government would respond
as quickly as possible.
But I don’t know how good
of a response they’d have.
And we’d be listening
to the news.
And if we don’t hear anything
good happening, we’d bug out.
When you’re planning to survive,
you’re planning to survive for,
like, an unknown amount of time.
You don’t know how much gear
you’re gonna take
so you’re trying to be
self-sufficient.
James is not a prepper and
he makes that pretty clear.
He is more of an
outdoorsman than anything,
but I still trust that if
there’s a disaster
that I can fall back on him.
This is three liters of water
and then it also has
a life straw in the pouch.
JAMES KIRK: I think Jack’s
prepping is the healthy amount
of prepping because he has a
plan but his prepping
isn’t getting in the way of his
school work and his friends.
NARRATOR: Jack’s bug-out
location is 50 miles
from his home.
But during Hurricane Sandy,
up to four feet of water
filled roads along the coast,
making them impassable by
foot or by car.
So if his family and friends are
unable to drive
due to flooded roads,
Jack wants them prepared to
bug out by kayak,
and portage the kayak with 136
pounds of gear one mile
to the Potomac River if
necessary.
JACK HOUSTON: So on
three, lift, all right?
JAMES KIRK: All right.
JACK HOUSTON: One, two, three.
I’m good. Are you?
JAMES KIRK: Yeah.
JACK HOUSTON: Turn
around if you can.
JAMES KIRK: I can’t.
JACK HOUSTON: All right.
I’ll guide you.
Go right, right.
JAMES KIRK: I honestly don’t
think we can make it
a mile like this.
JACK HOUSTON: For
this bug-out plan,
I’m definitely gonna have to
get some wheels for the kayaks
so that they can roll all
the way down to the water.
NARRATOR: Jack is assembling a
prepper group hand-picked
to weather a super storm he
believes will cripple Virginia.
JACK HOUSTON: Dalton, I’m gonna
put you in charge of navigation.
NARRATOR: So to test
that they are ready,
he and his teenage prepper group
are hiking over 10 miles
into the forest carrying
only essentials.
LACHLAN KERR: I’ve known
Jack for a long time.
We were in the same
Boy Scout troop.
Usually, we can just camp out in
the meadow just because
that’s nicer but, you know, when
you’re prepping, in a disaster,
you can’t go out in the meadow
because you’re easier seen.
Here, we had to think about it,
we had to put them
in a more strategic position.
JACK HOUSTON: We hiked in with
a bunch of bright orange tents,
which are great for camping
and survival
because they can be seen.
But they’re not what
you wanna have
when you’re trying to stay
concealed.
We’re probably gonna have to
take some leaflet or branches
and cover them up.
Careful, just take this
tree down.
JAMES KIRK: Oh [bleep]. Yeah.
JACK HOUSTON: That’s why
you need to be careful.
See how that kicked back up?
JAMES KIRK: That’s
why I stepped back.
JACK HOUSTON: We should
put one right there.
CONNOR: Yup. Let’s get one set
up… All right.
NARRATOR: Jack wants to make
their campsite perimeter secure.
JACK HOUSTON: Good place to
put a hobo alarm right here.
NARRATOR: So he is setting a
homemade trip-wire alarm system
using fishing line and pull
string alarms
across the nearby trails.
JACK HOUSTON: It’s a natural
bottleneck so anything
that’s trying to move across
this stream will definitely
go for the dryer portion of it.
So, all right, you get that
side, I got this side.
So I’ll give you.
CONNOR: I’m gonna need another
smaller piece of fishing line.
You wanna test it out?
JACK HOUSTON: Yeah.
…keep walking…
That definitely worked.
When they come by, they’ll
just trip it like that.
CONNOR: Or you accidentally trip
it crossing
or accidentally trip it coming
back. Either way, we got them.
JACK HOUSTON: Oh, look at
this one, that one’s massive.
I’ve never seen a grub
this big in my entire life.
If we don’t catch some
fish or something big soon,
we’re gonna be pretty hungry.
NARRATOR: Jack’s food resupply
plan relies entirely
on hunting and trapping.
So he and his group plan to
target multiple sources
of protein, including grubs,
caterpillars, fish,
and even frogs.
JACK HOUSTON: Time
for frog legs, guys.
I’ve never had frog legs before.
My dad always said that
they were pretty good.
So, I kind of wanted to try it
and I also wanna push myself.
ALL: Eat the frog, eat the frog,
eat the frog, eat the frog,
eat the frog, eat the
frog, eat the frog.
JACK HOUSTON: It’s not bad.
I just wouldn’t
have it typically.
Definitely in a survival
situation, I would though.
NARRATOR: Jack wants his prepper
team to be able to defend
their campsite and bug-out bags.
So, he’s organized a
defensive exercise.
LACHLAN KERR: We’re gonna take
you guys out.
There’s no question.
JACK HOUSTON: You haven’t
seen our strategy for this.
You guys don’t stand a chance.
I’m sorry.
So in this paintball scenario,
I’m gonna have James and Lachlan
be the preppers
and defend the camp.
And then I’m gonna take Connor
and Dalton out
and we’re gonna attack the
camp and be the marauders.
Our goal for this paintball
scenario is to get
as many bags as possible.
CONNOR: All right,
guys, one, two, three.
JACK HOUSTON: Connor sets off
this frickin’ hobo alarm and
it’s really just all
hell breaking loose.
We need to cover.
(Gun paintball sound)
We see James get shot and while
Lachlan’s focused on Connor,
I run up the hill.
NARRATOR: A flanking maneuver is
a military tactic
designed to overrun an enemy
force by coordinating attacks
on multiple sides.
Jack uses the maneuver to
lure the defenders
out of the encampment
so he can sneak in to capture
their supplies.
JACK HOUSTON: Nobody quite won
because everybody lost people,
but I thought it
went really well.
I think we learned a lot.
I think it’s a good thing for
people to prep
while still being connected to a
community of people
so we could work together to
fight through a disaster.
NARRATOR: The experts,
practical preppers,
have scored your preps in five
categories of 20 points each.
Food, 5 out of 20 points.
Water, 9 out of 20 points.
Shelter, 9 out of 20 points.
Security, 13 out of 20 points.
Jack, we commend you for
continuing to practice
your survival skills and
creating a network of friends
you can rely on in a doomsday
scenario.
15 X factor points.
Overall, you get
a 51 out of 100.
You have four months
initial survival time.
JACK HOUSTON: I think this
assessment is invaluable
and I’ll continue honing
my survival skills.
But I think I’ll last a
lot more than four months.
NARRATOR: Because of
rising sea levels,
future hurricanes are likely
to have a greater impact
with stronger storm surges
and greater flooding.
However, the state of Virginia
typically experiences a
hurricane once every two years
causing only minimal damage.

49 Tactical Flashlight Scam How Can One Shop Near Me


49 Facts About Tactical Flashlight Scam How Can One Shop At Dec 13th

Tactical Flashlight Scam How Can One Shop