Tactical Flashlight User Guide For Sale Buy Now

JASON BACK: Ow! (Bleep)!
They make it look so easy on TV.
NARRATOR: Two people with no
wilderness experience
dropped into the harshest
environments on the planet.
Their only lifeline…
MAN: Oh, holy (Bleep).
NARRATOR: …is someone
they’ve never met.
ALEX COKER: You can do this.
Keep pushing.
CLIFF HODGES: That water
is rising quickly, man.
You’ve got to get
across that river.
ALEX COKER: My
name is Alex Coker.
I’m a former United States Army
Infantry Airborne air assault
scout sniper.
I’m a former CIA special
protective agent.
I’m also a survival expert.
CLIFF HODGES: My
name is Cliff Hodges.
I own and operate an outdoor
school and guide service
and I teach primitive wilderness
survival skills.
NARRATOR: These experts using
high-end surveillance technology
from a remote location will
push the survivors
beyond their limits.
MAN: I don’t know about this.
ALEX COKER: Step
it up and move out.
SARAH TIEFENTHALER: In here?
Just straight through this?
NARRATOR: The only reward
is getting out alive.
MAN: [Grunts] (Bleep).
ALEX COKER: Take him out.
JASON BACK: My biggest worry
is staying hydrated and water.
This type of environment
you don’t drink water,
you’re definitely going to
suffer and eventually die.
My name is Jason Back.
I’m a narcotics detective.
I’m 40 years old.
I live in London, Kentucky.
Pretty much lived there my
whole live except for
when I was gone for the
military.
I’ve never been
anywhere like this.
I look forward to
being out here.
I think it’d definitely
be a challenge.
COLBY RAINES: The last time I
spent on a desert was
on the 12th of never.
I’ve never been in a desert.
I’m Colby Raines.
I’m from St. Louis, Missouri.
I do voiceovers.
This is new. It’s fresh.
I’m ready.
I’m looking forward to maybe
conquering my fear of heights.
JASON BACK: It’s
beautiful, but rugged.
I mean, nothing like I’ve
ever seen or been in before.
I seen a sign that said no
services for the next hundred
miles and I think that’s when
it kinda sunked in that
we were definitely going to
the middle of nowhere.
COLBY RAINES: Being
here in the outdoors,
it’s more of a
vacation than anything.
Some people might look at me
and say, that guy is arrogant.
He’s cocky.
No, it’s confidence,
total confidence.
JASON BACK: I’m as ready
as I’ll ever be, yeah.
Holy (Bleep).
COLBY RAINES: I’m ready to go
out there and
turn this into a clinic.
ALEX COKER: Colby,
welcome to Utah.
My name is Alex Coker.
I’m your survival expert.
I’m gonna make sure you get
through this challenge
safe and sound.
COLBY RAINES: Yes, sir.
ALEX COKER: Listen close.
You’re gonna have to climb your
way up deadly dunes
to get through flashflood-prone
riverbeds to reach
your overnight spot.
Then you have to find your way
out of a maze of canyon
to reach your extraction point.
CLIFF HODGES: Good
morning, Jason.
My name is Cliff.
I’m gonna be your
guide out here.
JASON BACK: I’m glad to hear it.
I definitely need one.
CLIFF HODGES: I want you to take
a look out into that canyon
in front of you. Tell me what
you see.
JASON BACK:
Unscalable rock walls,
a lot of rock and dirt
slides, and no water.
CLIFF HODGES: I would say that’s
a pretty good description
of what you’re looking at.
Here’s what we’re up against.
Your journey starts with a steep
descent through a loose rock
canyon followed by a long push
through a twisting river
to reach your overnight spot.
Then you’re gonna have to cross
endless arid plateaus
and riverbeds to reach
your extraction point.
You’ve been equipped with
state-of-the-art surveillance
and survival gear.
Your pack contains
a knife, flashlight,
rope and a specialty item I’ll
reveal later
to help you on your journey.
There’s also a camera to
record personal thoughts.
Your pack also contains an
ultra-long range transmission
technology that was developed
for unmanned drone applications.
Under your shirt, there’s a
Hexoskin biometric scanner
that records vital signs
including respiratory levels
and heart rate.
All this data is gonna be
transmitted via a series
of repeaters to a command and
control base
where I’ll be monitoring you.
JASON BACK: I’ll
protect it with my life.
ALEX COKER: Colby, on your
right arm is an arm band.
This allows for numerous
unmanned solo-shot cameras
placed throughout the region
to track your movements.
This is what I want you to do.
Look up, what do you see?
COLBY RAINES: Uh, nothing
but a big hill and skies.
ALEX COKER: Colby, I need you to
get to the top of this hill
and look for a river.
That’s gonna lead you to
your extraction point.
Embrace the suck,
ruck up and move out.
COLBY RAINES: Yes, sir.
I’m ready to get my butt kicked.
[Panting].
ALEX COKER: Colby, you’re
already breathing heavy.
COLBY RAINES: Wow. I’m in
terrible shape.
ALEX COKER: I said
get to the top.
I didn’t say sit there and rest.
On your shoulder, you’re
gonna see a button.
If for some reason you
cannot go any further,
push that button and it’ll
put out an emergency alert.
An emergency react team will
come pull your butt out.
COLBY RAINES: A
lot of real estate.
I see mountains, hills,
possibly a stream.
ALEX COKER: Anywhere to
get a Slurpee or hot dog?
COLBY RAINES: No, I cut those
out of my diet a long time ago.
ALEX COKER: Your gut instinct,
what do you think is gonna
be the best plan as far as
trying to find civilization?
COLBY RAINES: Follow the stream.
ALEX COKER: I’m gonna
concur with that.
Take the path of
least resistance.
Guide yourself down
towards that creek.
Tell me about some
of your fears.
COLBY RAINES: Heights.
ALEX COKER: How are you
feeling now
that you’re on top of this hill?
COLBY RAINES: (Bleep) (Bleep).
CLIFF HODGES: All right my
friend, you ready to rock?
JASON BACK: I’m ready.
CLIFF HODGES: All right, Jason,
start making your way down the
hill.
Temperatures here have soared
to record highs of 117 degrees.
Finding water and shade is gonna
be critical to your success.
JASON BACK: There’s a pretty
steep spot here, Cliff.
I’m gonna have to try
to find a way around it.
There’s no way I’m
getting over it.
CLIFF HODGES: All right,
look left and right.
Try to find your
easiest way down,
try to maintain three-points
of contact:
two feet, one hand on the
rocks at all times.
Watch your step and
keep your eyes peeled.
Alright, look left and right.
Definitely a rattlesnake,
some scorpions out here, man.
JASON BACK: I think we’re
opening into some water
down here.
CLIFF HODGES: Excellent, man.
Why don’t you walk on out there
and tell me everything you see?
JASON BACK: I see a creek,
a whole lot of canyon.
Looks kind of odd, though, it
looks like there’s some kind
of salt crust on the mud
around the water here.
CLIFF HODGES: That
is correct, sir.
The river water here has really
high levels of calcium sulfate,
which is also known as gypsum.
You can tell by all those little
white crystals that form
on the river’s edge where
the water evaporates.
It’s not toxic but at
these high concentrations,
it’s gonna have a pretty
severe laxative effect.
It could cause you to lose way
more water than you take in.
That’s just gonna make the
dehydration you’re facing
out here even worse.
So you definitely
can’t drink it,
we can’t even boil that
out for now so
we’re gonna have to find a
different water source
to purify to drink.
Start walking down stream.
JASON BACK: I don’t know if it’s
all this water or what, Cliff,
but I’m starting to get
some thirst going on here.
Mouth’s getting a little dry
and getting a little tinge of a
headache.
CLIFF HODGES: I’m seeing your
core temp come up a little bit.
Let’s look for some shade.
Heat exhaustion and heat strokes
start to happen at 105 degrees
and can even lead
to brain damage.
So if you stop sweating and
feel cramping
or like you’re gonna faint, you
have to let me know.
JASON BACK: Cliff, I see some
kind of old structure up here.
Might be a cabin or something.
CLIFF HODGES: Interesting.
Yeah, let’s, uh, let’s
go check that out.
Let’s see what we’ve got.
About half a century ago,
there were a lot of uranium
mines around here.
JASON BACK: Looks in pretty
good shape, actually.
I tell you, though; the sun
beating down
on the back of my neck sure
is hot.
CLIFF HODGES: I want you to take
this opportunity
to get you some shade.
JASON BACK: [Groans] I see a
cast-iron skillet over here.
CLIFF HODGES: What was that?
Could you say that again?
JASON BACK: A cast-iron skillet.
CLIFF HODGES: Let me see. Let me
get a good look at that.
I think we might have hit the
jackpot with that, my friend.
Blessed with a gift like that,
I think you gotta hold on
to it, man.
That could speed up our water
purification time by hours.
JASON BACK: Sounds good to me.
CLIFF HODGES: Still
got a headache?
JASON BACK: Yeah, and now my
throat’s getting a little dry
and itchy too.
CLIFF HODGES: I can’t do
much about the throat yet,
we can’t hydrate you yet.
But your core temp is slowly
rising and I’m worried about
that headache.
JASON BACK: I stopped sweating
at this point and lost any urge
to pee a few hours ago.
CLIFF HODGES: Go ahead and
splash some water on your face
from that river.
But definitely do not drink it.
JASON BACK: Sounds good.
CLIFF HODGES: Just remember,
if you start feeling dizzy
or faint, you think
you can’t make it,
you hit that button and our
evac team will come get you.
Jason, what are you doing?
Jason!
I know it’s hot out there but
I only told you to splash
some water on your face.
You got to keep in communication
with me at all times.
I’m your lifeline.
I couldn’t tell what was
going on when you went under.
JASON BACK: Sun beating
down on the back of my neck,
I have no choice but
to get in the river.
I’m moving.
CLIFF HODGES: You got at least
another four hours
until we get to any potential
overnight spots.
JASON BACK: Ten-four.
ALEX COKER: Colby,
look at those clouds.
Those are rain clouds.
See how gray they are?
Man, this is flashflood country.
We need to move
through here quick.
You need to be very careful.
Like I said, we do need to push.
If it’s dry here–if it
rains anywhere nearby,
it can quickly become a
wall of water and debris
coming right at you up to
30 miles an hour.
People die from it every year.
So, please, don’t dilly-dally
around down these lower areas.
COLBY RAINES: Yes, sir.
[Coughing].
A (Bleep) bug flew in my throat.
ALEX COKER: Colby, you just
got your first bit of food
and you’re already trying
to spit it up. What’s going on?
COLBY RAINES: No, a gnat
flew in my throat so.
ALEX COKER: Is that your body
rejecting all that goodness?
COLBY RAINES: [Coughs].
I think it’s all the dust.
This the first time I’ve ever
been in a desert in my life.
ALEX COKER: There’s a lot
of wild horses out here.
And if you notice,
all these wild horses,
they also leave their animal
dung laying on the ground.
If you actually happen
to see some animal dung,
find a nice dried up
piece and hold on to that,
keep it in a dry place.
COLBY RAINES: Literally.
This is complete
(Bleep) (Bleep).
ALEX COKER: You’re gonna use
that animal dung later
to start a fire with.
It’s from a herbivore, which
means it’s filled
with dried remains of plants
and grasses.
COLBY RAINES: Oh, geez. (Bleep).
ALEX COKER: So, you
collect the dung,
don’t sit there and have a
doggone biology project with it.
COLBY RAINES: (Bleep) all this.
(Bleep).
Oh, (Bleep) me.
JASON BACK: Pretty
thirsty, really hungry.
I’m hoping to get somewhere to
make camp for the night
and try to do something about
getting some water.
Actually I’m on the verge
of angry, hungry, angry.
These canyons are pretty
foreboding and intimidating.
There’s no climbing out any
way shape, form or fashion.
You can see there’s no getting
out of here except downstream.
CLIFF HODGES: Alright,
Jason, let’s move out.
JASON BACK: Not knowing when
next time I’m gonna get to eat
or have drinkable water,
plays heavily on you.
CLIFF HODGES: You can’t just
stop in and grab food or water
when you want it.
JASON BACK: One thing
about it, though,
I can always just look around
and see how small I am and
how beautiful all this is.
CLIFF HODGES: That’s
absolutely right, brother.
We’re just a little
speck out here.
You like Mexican food?
JASON BACK: At this point,
I would eat anything.
CLIFF HODGES: You
ever had nopales?
JASON BACK: Do what?
CLIFF HODGES: Nopales.
At a Mexican restaurant.
You never had that dish?
JASON BACK: No.
CLIFF HODGES: It’s cactus and
they say that’s what you got
all around you there.
You see those small little kind
of like beaver tail cactus
with the flat paddle?
JASON BACK: Oh, is
this it right here?
CLIFF HODGES: That would be it.
That would make perfect cooking
when we get your fire started.
So you gotta be
real careful though,
those thorns are
sharp as all hell.
They’ll go right through your
gloves and pierce your fingers
and we don’t want that.
Use your knife.
Easiest way to do is just kind
of scratch off thorns
from a big enough area that
you can grasp it
with two fingers to hold it
still.
And then you can cut
it off at the base.
And then just kind of hold it
against the ground
and use your knife, broad side,
and just scrape all those
thorns off.
It’s kind of like bell peppers.
Slice ’em up and cook ’em up.
JASON BACK: Great,
I hate bell peppers.
Alright, slippin’ these guys on
my pocket
and I’ll be ready to go.
ALEX COKER: What’s your thirst
level on one to ten right now,
Colby?
COLBY RAINES: Ooh,
eight, almost nine.
ALEX COKER: Look, I
know you’re thirsty,
but there’s too many
contaminants in the water
like giardia.
You can find a small pebble,
any small–find a
small pebble on the ground,
not too big, not too small.
You can place that in your
mouth and suck on that.
What that does is it starts
creating saliva in your mouth.
COLBY RAINES: Got it.
ALEX COKER: All right,
don’t choke on it.
Just suck away.
COLBY RAINES: [Gagging].
ALEX COKER: What did
you just spit out?
COLBY RAINES: A rock.
ALEX COKER: You must’ve
picked a bad rock.
COLBY RAINES: Yeah, it didn’t
have–it didn’t taste right, so.
ALEX COKER: You’re about six
hours into your journey.
You’ve made it through
the deadly dunes.
But we still have a few more
hours in these riverbeds
to get to the overnight spot.
COLBY RAINES: I can feel it.
Pretty tired, pretty worn
out, pretty dehydrated.
I can’t wait for that water.
How much further do
we have with this?
ALEX COKER: A lot.
COLBY RAINES: And how much
further without water,
do you think?
ALEX COKER: We’re
working on that.
COLBY RAINES: (Bleep) me.
Pissed off as (Bleep) honestly.
ALEX COKER: Why
are you pissed off?
COLBY RAINES: [Sighs].
I don’t know.
Just more of a
song and dance man.
Like, honestly, I’m a
knucklehead from the street.
I’ll be the–you know, I’m
not the outdoors guy, so.
[Coughs].
COLBY RAINES: It looks like
there’s a stream over here.
Really?
CLIFF HODGES: All right, Jason,
you’ve been walking
for six hours.
We need to find some
water to purify.
Let’s start looking
for some rock sources.
So we’ve got some naturally
occurring chert and flint.
The flint is gonna have a
distinctive glass-like
high pitch when you
tap them together.
Hopefully they’ll help
us start a fire later.
No, we want it a higher pitch,
almost like tapping glass
bottles together.
Keep an eye out
for reddish rocks.
Most of the flint out
here is a red color.
What we’re looking for here
is a microcrystalline chert.
When those stones are
hit against metal,
they’ll create sparks.
JASON BACK: What about this?
CLIFF HODGES: Dude,
that looks awesome.
Grab another small rock
and kind of tap it.
Let me hear it.
JASON BACK: Sounds good.
Hold on. I found it, I think.
CLIFF HODGES: Let me see.
Hold that up.
That looks perfect.
Those little rocks are gonna
keep you warm
and purify your water tonight.
JASON BACK: Sounds great.
Rocks are stowed
safely, ready to move.
CLIFF HODGES: Looks like you got
a slot canyon across the river
from you, a little side
diversion route that goes
kind of up into some real
thin, narrow caves.
Do you see that?
JASON BACK: Yeah, I see that.
CLIFF HODGES: I think that’s
gonna present us
with a couple of opportunities.
I got a couple of ideas for you.
So why don’t you humor me and
head on up into that slot canyon
and we’ll see what Mother
Nature’s gonna provide us
up there.
JASON BACK: Sounds good.
I see a pool of water.
CLIFF HODGES: You see water?
JASON BACK: I do.
It’s–weird color, but it’s
definitely a pool of water.
CLIFF HODGES: So
here’s the thing.
That water looks pretty
gross, doesn’t it?
JASON BACK: Yes, it does.
CLIFF HODGES: But you know what?
It’s a whole hell of a lot
better than the water
in the river. It’s not clean.
You can’t drink it without
boiling it but it doesn’t have
all those ore and calcium
deposits that were in the river.
So even though this stuff
doesn’t look like
the best option, it really is.
JASON BACK: Works for me.
Let’s get to it.
COLBY RAINES: (Bleep).
ALEX COKER: All this vegetation
means there has got to be
a water source nearby.
So embrace the suck and
fight through that brush!
COLBY RAINES: This
looks like sewage.
ALEX COKER: Something is
better than nothing, Colby.
Look up all around, up
high at the very top edges.
What’s happening is the
rainfall’s rained down,
fallen down, and has pooled down
in that pool
that you see before you.
That water then drains
down into the creek.
COLBY RAINES: Garbage.
ALEX COKER: That’s gonna be your
cleaner water
than the water that’s running
through the creek
that’s been running
for miles and miles,
giving you that calcium
sulfate effect.
Now granted it’s not the
cleanest looking water
right now, but we’ll work on
that.
I want you to also kind of
walk around the edges of it,
tell me what you see.
COLBY RAINES: Uh, tadpoles, um,
a little mossy, grassy stuff.
ALEX COKER: Tadpoles?
You ever eaten a tadpole?
COLBY RAINES: Uh, not
since breakfast, but…
ALEX COKER: Okay, well, I’m
gonna let you have it
for lunch then.
How does that sound?
COLBY RAINES: Not too good.
ALEX COKER: What’s the grossest
thing you’ve ever eaten?
(Sighs)
COLBY RAINES: Most Chinese food
I think is pretty gross, so.
ALEX COKER: You like sushi?
COLBY RAINES: I don’t eat fish.
ALEX COKER: Daggone,
Colby, what do you eat?
COLBY RAINES: Uhhh, I’m mostly a
turkey, chicken, steak guy.
ALEX COKER: Well, I’m sorry
we don’t have no turkeys,
steak or chicken.
We got tadpoles on the menu.
Tadpoles can carry salmonella if
they’ve been sitting in
stagnate water for a long period
of time.
But this is a recent rain pool,
so he should just be fine.
Colby, go ahead
and dig in there.
It’s dinner time.
COLBY RAINES: Geez.
ALEX COKER: Your family told me
to make sure you got all
your nutrients and vitamins in.
So we’re not only gonna get
you your protein in there
that little tadpoles, but if you
look over, keep searching around
you’re gonna find some
cattails in the area,
possibly the younger shoots.
Sometimes they’re in the
water, sometimes they’re not.
CLIFF HODGES: I think this slot
canyon is gonna be our best bet
for a shelter spot tonight.
JASON BACK: Thank you, Cliff.
CLIFF HODGES: We can use the
walls of the canyon
as natural heat reflectors
from your camp fire.
Have you ever made a fire
by flint and steel before?
JASON BACK: I have not.
CLIFF HODGES: Have
you ever seen it?
Do you have a basic
idea of how it works?
JASON BACK: Yeah, you scratch
one against the other
and hope for sparks.
CLIFF HODGES: [Chuckles].
That’s pretty much it, man.
You nailed it.
So once you have all
the wood over there,
let’s start with just the very
tiniest pieces you collected
and then you layer on the
outside the next larger stick
with a little doorway,
cause that doorway is where
we’re gonna stick
a flaming tinder bundle to get
the whole thing lit.
In your pack, I’ve provided you
with a specialty item
to help you get a fire started.
It’s a steel striker
with some char cloth.
Place that char cloth on your
flint rock
and strike the steel against it.
Hopefully you’ll catch a spark
on the char cloth
and it’ll give you enough
flame to get that tinder lit.
JASON BACK: Okay.
Here goes everything.
I’m not getting a spark
as much as I’d like.
CLIFF HODGES: It’s
not easy, man.
JASON BACK: Ouch!
Oh, it touched it.
CLIFF HODGES: You got a spark
hit the cloth
but it didn’t catch?
JASON BACK: Yep.
CLIFF HODGES: All right,
man, you’re getting closer.
JASON BACK: Ow! (Bleep)!
I’m gonna put one
of my gloves on.
I’m destroying my hand.
Oh, oh, I got one. I got one.
CLIFF HODGES: Be
really gentle with it.
Use a little oxygen.
JASON BACK: (Bleep) It went out.
(Bleep) [Grunting].
They make it look so easy on TV.
CLIFF HODGES: What’s going
through your head right now,
Jason? How you feeling?
What are you thinking?
JASON BACK: Start a (Bleep)
fire, start a (Bleep) fire.
CLIFF HODGES: That’s pretty much
all you need to be thinking
right now, man.
JASON BACK: Son of a (Bleep).
Ow! (Bleep)!
(Bleep).
Oh, it almost caught one.
Damn it!
(Bleep).
This is just beyond frustrating.
(Bleep).
CLIFF HODGES: There you go, man.
Feed it some air,
feed it some air.
Now get it into
that fire structure.
Perfect.
JASON BACK: Thank you, geebus.
CLIFF HODGES: Keep
adding fuel and oxygen.
That’s a beautiful sight I’m
seeing on your camera right now.
JASON BACK: You have no idea.
CLIFF HODGES: And
then once, like,
it looks like it’s
going really good,
you’re gonna go ahead and fill
up your pan full of water
and bring it on over.
JASON BACK: Sounds good.
Burn, baby, burn.
ALEX COKER: Keep going.
All right, that’s it. Yeah,
right there, right there.
Look down.
Yeah.
See, what I want you to do, I
want you to take your hand
go all the way down at the
b–at the very bottom of it,
right through the root –right
at the very bottom
and then pull up.
Grab the–right through the
ground level, pull up now.
What I want you to do is take it
and start shredding it
like you do like a corn
on a cob.
There you go, perfect.
What you should have
left is a white stalk.
Keep peeling it down till it’s
just white
and then take a bite of it.
It should be tasting
like a cucumber.
It’ll quench your thirst
a little bit
and give you something to put
in your stomach.
Put it so I can see it.
Why you spitting it out for?
COLBY RAINES:
Taste like garbage.
[Sighs].
ALEX COKER: How you
feeling after that?
COLBY RAINES: Garbage.
I tell you.
Hmm.
ALEX COKER: So no thankful,
not thankful at all for that?
COLBY RAINES: Yeah.
The cesspool here is
really pissing me off.
ALEX COKER: People in other
countries that are drinking
worse.
COLBY RAINES: I’m just glad
I don’t live there, so.
JASON BACK: Hey, I’m no expert,
but this kind of looks like
an onion.
CLIFF HODGES: Indeed it
is, my man, good eye.
Let’s grab those and put
’em on our fire to cook.
Out here in the wild, we gotta
make use of everything
that nature provides.
There’s a bounty of
food all around us.
We just gotta know
where to look for it.
JASON BACK: Roger that.
ALEX COKER: You see
that tadpole area there.
What I want you to do is trough
those tadpoles and possibly…
…fish out onto the shore.
Once you got them
out on the shore,
we need to find a way to
collect those for later.
Hey, Colby, you hear me?
What’s happening?
What’s going on?
COLBY RAINES: I don’t
know what I was expecting,
but this is just not my deal.
ALEX COKER: I think you’re
just dehydrated at the moment,
and you’re not
thinking straight.
COLBY RAINES: I don’t know how
much farther I can go, you know.
ALEX COKER: I’m not
ready for you to quit.
You made it through the deadly
dunes and the riverbeds.
You’re only two miles
from your overnight spot.
COLBY RAINES: My head’s
not in it, you know.
I’m worn. I don’t… if I can
honestly hack it.
ALEX COKER: You’re finding your
true inner self right now.
And I think you’re a
lot stronger than that.
Colby, he’s physically fit.
He’s got what it takes to
survive and get through this,
but he mentally shut down.
The, I in acronym
survival is improvise.
You gotta get through these
small little challenges.
That’s the only way to
survive on this situation.
Colby, your body will surprise
you of what’s capable of doing.
It will not quit as long as you
will not let your mind
allow it to quit.
What about all that stuff you
said on the way down here?
All that crazy, cocky talk?
COLBY RAINES: You know, I
guess nature will humble you.
I mean, I don’t know what
I was getting myself into,
but I just–I don’t know what.
I’m just mentally not here.
It’s just–I know I can do it.
It’s just–I don’t know.
I don’t know what it is.
ALEX COKER: Are you sure?
COLBY RAINES: Yeah,
I’m positive, man.
I’m done.
ALEX COKER: All right, you
remember the directions
I gave you at the very
beginning.
If you feel you cannot go on,
push the button that’s on your
shoulder
and we’ll have an emergency
reaction team come in
and get you out of here.
ALEX COKER: I’m very
disappointed that you feel
that way, but you need to
realize that this isn’t
Star Trek where you can just
beam yourself out of there.
You still have a five-hour
hike ahead of you
with my medivac team.
COLBY RAINES: Oh, (Bleep).
CLIFF HODGES: You’re gonna need
a ton of wood to keep
that fire going before you put
your water on to boil.
JASON BACK: Sounds good.
(Bleep).
Big wood is getting
hard to find.
ALEX COKER: Colby, I’m gonna go
ahead and hand you off
to the med team now.
COLBY RAINES: All
right, sounds like fun.
ALEX COKER: They’re gonna
see you out of here.
And your mission
with me, it’s over.
COLBY RAINES: Mother Nature
will make you humble.
I’m not tough.
You know, this is tough stuff.
Water.
People take it for granted.
Throwing it out,
going down the drain.
And when you truly need it,
you just…
it kinda makes a monster
out of you.
How far is the camp from here?
MAN: We got two miles
to go, just about.
COLBY RAINES: Oh, (Bleep) me.
ALEX COKER: When someone
hits rock bottom,
they’re either gonna strive
and do great things or…
…they’re gonna sit there and
they’re gonna crumble
right before your very eyes.
Why you spitting it out for?
COLBY RAINES: It
taste like garbage.
ALEX COKER: There’s not
a lot of food out there.
Why are you gonna spit out the
little food that you have
down on the ground?
He gets down inside that fresh
water pool that
I have found for him…
COLBY RAINES: The cesspool
here is really pissing me off.
ALEX COKER: …he shuts down.
COLBY RAINES: I’m done.
ALEX COKER: He talked
a big game, you know,
when he first came in, so
I took him for his word.
COLBY RAINES: I’m ready to go
out there and
turn this into a clinic.
ALEX COKER: Are you
freaking kidding me?
COLBY RAINES: This
is not my deal.
ALEX COKER: Most of the
time, when people shut down,
all they need is someone to
listen to their problems,
and Colby wasn’t having it.
CLIFF HODGES: Okay, let’s do the
cactus and the wild onions
on coals, and really make
sure they don’t char out.
Once they char out, you’re
losing almost
all your nutritional values.
So we’re just
lightly cooking them.
So keep them on coals
but out of flame.
JASON BACK: Ow! (Bleep)!
Okay, the onions and
cactus are on the fire.
CLIFF HODGES: And now we just
have to wait for the water
to boil.
It’s gotta be 212 degrees for a
solid minute or two to kill off
the protozoa that cause giardia.
You know you’ve got that
when you hit a rolling boil.
JASON BACK: Alright, I’ve got
the fire going, water boiling.
I’ve found what Cliff says is
wild onion that I’ve roasted.
I’m gonna try it.
Pretty damn good.
Let’s try some of this cactus.
I’m used to onion.
I’ve never eaten cactus.
This will be the
first go around.
It’s not bad.
It don’t really
have a lot of taste.
The skin…
I don’t think is…
it’s too chewy to eat.
I’m basically just treating it
like a green bean and eating
the seeds out the middle,
the juice out the middle.
I’m trying not to look at my pot
because it won’t boil if I do.
(Bleep).
It’s just making my mouth
so dry, I can’t even eat it.
Now boil. (Bleep)
CLIFF HODGES: How’s
the water looking?
JASON BACK: The water ain’t
looking worth a (Bleep).
CLIFF HODGES: We need
to hit a rolling boil.
As soon as you hit
that full rolling boil,
you can take it off the fire and
let it start to cool
so you can drink it.
JASON BACK: Oh, it’s actually
starting to bubble some.
There’s like two
(Bleep) drinks left.
It’s evaporating
to like nothing.
Literally (Bleep) nothing.
CLIFF HODGES: So. Let’s go ahead
and fill it up again then.
Now that the pan is hot, it’s
not gonna take as long as to…
to boil it.
JASON BACK: (Bleep).
(Bleep), (Bleep), (Bleep).
CLIFF HODGES: Why don’t you go
ahead and eat some more
of the cactus and wild onions
while we’re waiting
for the water to boil?
JASON BACK: My mouth’s so dry
I can’t (Bleep) put anything in
it, man.
CLIFF HODGES:
Alright, we’ll wait.
JASON BACK: [Sighs].
I think it’s boiling
pretty good, Cliff.
CLIFF HODGES: Let’s pull
it off and let it cool.
JASON BACK: Thank you, skillet.
Fairly hot water out of a rusty
cast-iron skillet
with a piece of cactus in it.
Life is good.
Okay, it’s the
morning of day two.
I have no idea what time it is.
Here’s what’s left of
the fire from last night.
I feel pretty good this morning.
My throat’s a little
scratchy, my legs are sore.
I can’t stay here forever.
I’ve got to make it out.
So at this point, I
just need to suck it up,
pack it up and move on.
CLIFF HODGES: Let’s put your
gear back on and get ready
to move out.
It’s at least a five-hour hike
to your extraction point.
Temperatures are gonna be
getting into the triple digits
real soon.
JASON BACK: Okay,
I’m headed out.
CLIFF HODGES: You gotta
keep driving, Jason.
It’s not even triple
digit heat yet.
The worse is yet to come.
So I definitely can tell you’re
moving a little slower
than yesterday.
You feeling all right?
JASON BACK: Yeah, it’s just the
bottom of the river here is kind
of real rocky and if it’s
not, it’s real muddy.
It’s kind of slowing
me down a little bit.
But slow and steady
wins the race.
CLIFF HODGES: Alright, Jason, so
you made it through the loose
rock canyon,
that twisting river,
and you walked six hours across
the arid plateau and riverbed.
All you have to do is turn to
your right and go up
and over that berm there where
the river meets back up.
That’s gonna be your
extraction point.
The only thing with this is
when you pull up out of that
riverbed,
that temperature is
gonna jump on you.
If you feel like the headaches
are coming back
or you’re about to faint,
that’s probably heatstroke
creeping back in on you.
JASON BACK: Copy.
Moving on.
CLIFF HODGES: If you
get into trouble,
you’ve always got that last
resort of the panic button.
Just know that.
JASON BACK: Not an option.
CLIFF HODGES: Not an option.
That’s the man.
How you feeling?
You notice that
jump in temperature?
JASON BACK: It’s definitely
a lot hotter up here.
CLIFF HODGES: I know
that, my friend, I know.
JASON BACK: This desert’s mean.
The sun bakes you from the top
and the reflection of it off
the sand bakes you from the
bottom.
I can see how it’s easy
to get lost in this,
so I just hope the river’s over
there close to it somewhere.
CLIFF HODGES: We really
got to get you
to your extraction point now.
I know it’s warm already and
most people think noon
is the hottest time of the
day…
JASON BACK: (Bleep).
CLIFF HODGES: But out
here in the summer,
it’s not till hours later after
about nine hours of sunlight.
Oh, man, according
to your Hexoskin,
your body temp is rising.
(Panting)
JASON BACK: I see water again.
CLIFF HODGES: With how
hot it’s getting out here,
I want you to walk right down
the middle of the river.
Keep your clothes wet, the water
evaporating off of you
is gonna act just like sweat
and bring your body temperature
down,
but you’re not gonna lose
water and get dehydrated.
Follow that river all the
way to your extraction point.
JASON BACK: Moving down river.
CLIFF HODGES: How
do those legs feel?
JASON BACK: You know, it wasn’t
that bad walking in the water
yesterday.
But today, it’s
just…agony every step.
CLIFF HODGES: Well, yeah,
you’re hungrier, more tired,
more dehydrated than yesterday,
and my readings are showing
it’s even hotter out there than
it was yesterday,
so that is rough, rough
situation.
Go ahead and work your
way up to–onto the bank.
Tell me what you see out there.
JASON BACK: Desolate, a bunch of
green that you can’t eat
and you can’t use for anything,
and a bunch of nothing.
CLIFF HODGES: What I see
is the end of your journey.
You’re all done.
Welcome to the extraction
point, my friend.
Man.
JASON BACK: Oh!
CLIFF HODGES: Dude, it is great
to finally meet you in person.
JASON BACK: Yes. Thank you for
that.
CLIFF HODGES: Have some water.
JASON BACK: Oh, my goodness.
CLIFF HODGES: You got most
of it in your beard there.
JASON BACK: I’ll get it later.
Oh [groans].
It was just emotional
rollercoaster; up and down,
up and down.
But then, you know, Cliff really
helped me because he,
he would tell me, you know, hey,
you’re gonna make it.
You know, he really
kept me going.
It was all because of you.
It just goes to show you that
the body will follow
if the mind’s willing.
CLIFF HODGES: If you could have
anything to eat right now,
what would you eat?
JASON BACK: Anything. It don’t
even have to be hot.
CLIFF HODGES: Let’s go find
a hot plate of anything.
JASON BACK: Just a plate
of anything.
CLIFF HODGES: Yeah, let’s go.
Jason went through some
stuff that, to be honest,
there was a few times on this
course that
I was scared for him.
But Jason has that no quit
attitude no matter what.
I don’t think he even considered
the orange button
an option at any point.

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